All You Ever Wanted To Dysautonomia


Definition:

  1. Dysautonomia refers to a malfunction or disorder of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). This is usually involves failure of the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system; but it can also mean that the ANS may be overactive. Dysautonomia refers to the “involuntary” systems of the body. This can include: body temperature, blood pressure, respiratory/breathing, sleep, heart rate and more. Dysautonomia can be considered “Local” as it is in many cases of CRPS, or it can be a total Autonomic failure. Sometimes Dysautonomia is considered to be “acute” and reversible. Other times it may be chronic and progressive (as in Diabetes or Parkinson’s). A person may be diagnosed with Dysautonomia by itself, as a condition. It can also be associated with degenerative and neurological diseases. Dyauatonomia is actually an “Umbrella term” used to describe many different issues that occur due to the malfunction of the Autonomic Nervous System.Lastly, Dysautonomia is responsible for our “fight-or- flight” response. This is what gets our body ready for stressful situations. When the nerves of the ANS are damaged, you can get Autonomic Neuropathy as well. These dysfunctions can range from mild to life threatening.
  2. What People Are Saying: people are saying that Dysautonomia is a common ailment among people with autoimmune illnesses, CRPS, Chiari, Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and even Diabetes. The most common symptoms that people in the chronic pain community speak about is a fall in blood pressure during standing or “Orthostatic Hypertension” or a rapid pulse rate. Other things that are said about Dysautonomia are that it causes abnormal sweating, emotional instability and motor incoordination.
  3. Symptoms: Some symptoms of Dysautonomia *(aka Autonomic nerve disorders) are: syncope (fainting), Orthostatic Hypotension and/or intolerance, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome), Gastroparesis, Intestinal Dysmotility, constipation, Erectile daysfunction and neurogenic bladder. Other symptoms include: fatigue, light-headedness, weakness and cognitive impairment. In Dysautonomia involving the Gastrointestinal tract, the patients often feels nausea, bloating, vomiting and abdominal pain, when the ANS malfunctions.
  4. Possible comorbidities: Possible illnesses that go along with Dysautonomia can include: CRPS, EDS, Chiari, Gastroparesis, Autoimmune illnesses, Lupus, POTS, NCS (Neurocardiogenic Syncope). Other co-morbidities include: Multiple Sclerosis, RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis), Celiac Disease, Autonomic Neuropathy & Sjogren’s Syndrome etc. The worst form of Dysautonomia, which is a fatal form that occurs in adults ages 40 and up, is called MSA. This means, “Multiple System Atrophy”. It is similar to Parkin-son’s disease but MSA patients become fully bedridden wishing 2 years of diagnosis. But please note that this is very, very rare and only about 350,000 people have the MSA form, worldwide.
  5. Treatment options: There is no cure currently for Dysautonomia at this time but secondary forms can improve with treatments for the underlying disease. You can help the Orthostatic hypotension by elevating the head of the bed, rapid water infusion (given rapidly in an IV) and eating a higher salt diet. Other treatments may include exercise and healthy diet.
  6. FDA approved medications: Midodrine is an FDA approved medication that helps with the syncope and collapse.
  1. Complimentary Therapies: Biofeedback and exercise with the right amount of salt may help some of the symptoms of Dysautonomia. Biofeedback can teach you how to calm yourself of anxiety which often comes with this illness. There was a Webinar back in early Winter 2017, that US Pain hosted. It was about “Earthing” or “Grounding (”http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads%2Fi-think-earthing-cured-my-dysautonomia-pots.24992%2F and this therapy has been known to help this person; who wrote her experiences about “Grounding” helping her symptoms of Dysautonomia. *I was also prescribed a “cooling vest” to help with the feeling of overheating inside of my body
  2. Best nutrition: higher salt intake and staying hydrated are the two most important things to remember with Dysautonomia and nutrition.
  3. Best exercise regime: Exercise can be difficult when you feel very fatigued and barely able to stand at times. Also, you need to get the permission of your Physicians before starting any exercise program. Also, staying hydrated while increasing aerobic exercise, lower extremity strengthening, increasing fluid/salt intake and psychophysiologic training for management of pain and anxiety, along with family education. People also say that exercise intolerance is part of Dysautonomia but it is essential to helping with it. Start off slowly and avoid exercises that cause orthostatic stress. This includes minimal or no vertical movement, including rowing, recumbent biking or swimming.
  1. . Local Support groups: Local support groups can be found at the website: “Dysautonomia International”, here: Dysautonomia International and you may email Dysautonomia International at: info@dysautonomia for online support group resources. They do not verify the accuracy of information posted in the groups*.
  2. . Links to other organizations and websites and additional info: The best website with a lot of information here: ( Dysautonomia International ) at “Dysautonomia International”. They have links to support groups and online support, as well as diet and exercise tips.
  3. : Personal story for someone to connect with: Dysautonomia is something that I was likely born with. I was involved and injured in two automobile accidents that have inevitably made it much worse. First in 1983, I was hit by a drunk driver while sitting at a red stop light. Secondly, in 2002, a man in a pickup truck, ran through a red light and I suffered multiple injuries and had many surgeries. I also suffered an MTBI or “MildTraumatic Brain Injury”. One of my treatment team of Dr.’s is a Neurocardiologist, and he told me that my Dysautonomia was made much worse due to the “sloshing” of my cerebellum against the skull wall. I do have severe systemic CRPS, Chiari, RA, Autonomic Neuropathy, Polyneuropathy in Collagen Vascular Disease (aka EDS type 4/vascular) and Gastroparesis. These are all hallmarks of the umbrella illness of Dysautonomia. Following the auto accident in 2002, I was fainting quite often. We found out that my brain was not telling my heart what to do, because I have Autonomic Nervous System Failure. I ended up requiring a dual changer pacemaker. It now does 87% of the work for my heart. I am very lucky to have found a wonderful specialist in Dr. Blair Grubb, MD at the University of Toledo Medical Center. He is known around the world as far away as the UK!

**Various other personal stories for me are found here at my blog “Tears of Truth” and at: tearsoftruth.com:

A). Dysautonomia/POTS & S.I.B.O. and this one: Article about Dysautonomia/POTS & SIBO

B). Another article for you!Https://Wordpress.com/post/tearsoftruth.com/9263

Helpful YouTube Videos:

A. Dysautonomia/POTS

B.Dr Blair Grubb on POTs

***Informational Sources:

1. Dictionary.com on Dysautonomia

2. Medical News Today in Dysautonomia

3. Dysautonomia International

4. http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads%2Fi-think-earthing-cured-my-dysautonomia-pots.24992%2F

5. Dysautonomia International more on Dysautonomia

6. Mayo Clinic on Dysautonomia

7. Healthline.com on Dysautonomia

8. Clevland Clinic on Dysautonomia

9.WordPress blog “Tears of Truth” on Dysautonomias

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s