Josh Bloom Exposes Makers of Tylenol


(They’re no better than Kolodny)

The makers of the OTC “medication” (I use the term “medication” very loosely) “Tylenol” are now trying to reap the benefits of the pain caused by Andrew Kolodny & his minions. Touting the idea that Tylenol actually helps post -surgical pain! When in the writing in the back of the box, in minuscule letters; states that Tylenol is actually “for minor aches & pains”! Josh Bloom, the author of the article below, asks the question; Which is it? Is it for the horrible pain after some major surgeries? Or is it for minor aches & pains? They can’t have it both ways! I think you’ll find this article fascinating. After reading the article, please check out the link to another article by a Physician, Dr. Aric Hausknecht MD. He even goes on to explain how dangerous Tylenol can be! Opioids never hurt me in 14 years. They have little or no side effects an if someone is a little bit drowsy, they just need to wait a week for that symptom of a new medication to go away. People can drive While taking opioids! That’s ridiculous !

This is a reprint of an article that was sent to me, with all credits to Josh Bloom This the link to this article in full. Written by Josh Bloom

I’ve also posted it here for your convenience. But please visit the article in its entirety with comments as well. Please go and tell Johnson & Johnson what you think of their plot to fool the ill, disabled & elderly! They are some bad people over at: Tylenol.com headquarters online

Johnson & Johnson’s Shameless Exploitation Of The Opioid Crisis

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If you’re in the mood to get really pissed off feel free to visit Tylenol.com. But don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Of course, this is just my opinion, but it would seem that Johnson and Johnson is doing a splendid job of trying to boost Tylenol sales by using a none-too-well-concealed attempt to exploit the anti-opioid jihad that continues to run rampant in the U.S., despite overwhelming evidence that war against pain medications has done very little good and very much harm.

1. Johnson and Johnson tries to modernize. And capitalize.

Maybe the company is trying out a new slogan.

Old: 

No More Tears®

New:

“No More Scruples” 

2. Confusing labels.

There are at least three items on the Tylenol website that suggest that J&J is trying to cash in on the opioid crisis, a big no-no in my book. 

Let’s start with some of the language on the label. It not only makes no sense but, in fact, appears to be self-contradictory. Here is part of it:

(Figure 1) Is Tylenol really useful for post-surgical pain? Source:Tylenol.com

I don’t know what parameters J&J used to make the claim that Tylenol is the “#1 Doctor recommended OTC Brand for Post-Surgical Pain Relief.” Because if you look a little more carefully at the rest of label you’ll run into the following (in much smaller letters):

(Figure 2) Translation:  “Use only as directed. For minor aches and pains.” Image: Tylenol.com

3. You can’t have it both ways.

Perhaps you are now asking yourself, “Hmm. if the stuff is meant to be used for minor aches and pains then how can J&J be touting it as the #1 doctor recommended drug for post-surgical pain? Something doesn’t add up here. Post-surgical pain is usually not “minor.” Perhaps the company can explain which of these statements is true. Is Tylenol really so great for post-op pain, such as that from a knee replacement? Or is it more suitable scraped knee?

Based on my own experience with the stuff I’d rather take this. It won’t make me feel any better, but at least it’s yummy!

Have severe pain after surgery? Ask if the hospital pharmacy carries this. Works about as well and Tylenol, but it tastes better.  Image: Candy Warehouse

4. Bottom feeders and the bottom line.

If you click on an innocuous looking button – CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS – it would seem that the company has finally revealed its intentions. 

$hamless. Source. Tylenol.com

Whoa! Why on earth would a company that makes Tylenol put “opioid-free tablets” in the product description? Here’s my best guess. 

That phrase in the red box cannot be there by accident. Since opioid analgesic pills are now (wrongly) equated with “deadly” J&J probably figured that it could score some cheap points by restating the obvious: Tylenol doesn’t contain any opioid; it never did (1). So consumers should feel perfectly comfortable buying a drug that is strong enough for post-surgical pain (No – it barely works for anything. See Note #2) and safe (It’s not so safe either. See Note #3.)

There sure is a lot of double talk in the Tylenol campaign. It sounds vaguely familiar, the use of trickery – half-truths and partial facts to make a point. Where might we have seen something of this nature? Let me think it over for a moment. 

Oh, yeah. It’s this.

Andrew “Pez Head” Kolodny

 

NOTES:

(1) Exception: tylenol-codeine combinations like Tylenol #3, which are prescription drugs.

(2) The following conclusions were taken from Cochrane reviews of the quality of evidence of efficacy of acetaminophen (or the lack thereof) to treat certain conditions. Originally in the article Tylenol Isn’t So Safe, But At Least It Works, Right?

  •  Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip – “In conclusion, there is little evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions.”
  • Acute and Chronic Lower Back Pain – “We found high-quality evidence that paracetamol (4 g per day) is no better than placebo for relieving acute LBP in either the short or longer term. It also worked no better than placebo on the other aspects studied, such as quality of life and sleep quality.”
  • Back Pain, and Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis – “Paracetamol is ineffective in the treatment of low back pain and provides minimal short term benefit for people with osteoarthritis. These results support the reconsideration of recommendations to use paracetamol for patients with low back pain and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in clinical practice guidelines.”
  • Headaches – The outcome of being pain free or having only mild pain at two hours was reported by 59 in 100 people taking paracetamol 1000 mg...”  but “[the same result was seen in “49 out of 100 people taking placebo.”
  • Colds  “The data in this review do not provide sufficient evidence to inform practice regarding the use of acetaminophen for the common cold in adults.”
  • Fever – “[Tylenol] and ibuprofen lower the child’s temperature and relieve their discomfort.”

So, the only evidence-based indication for the utility of Tylenol (according to Cochrane reviews) is lowering children’s fever. There is no strong evidence that it works well for anything else, although it does seem to amplify the analgesic ability of ibuprofen, and vice versa. 

(2) Dr. Aric Hauseknect, a neurologist and pain management specialist in New York, makes this quite clear when in a 2017 interview. “Tylenol is by far the most dangerous drug ever made.” See (See Pain In The Time Of Opioid Denial: An Interview With Aric Hausknecht, M.D.)

If you’re in the mood to get really pissed off feel free to visit Tylenol.com. But don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Of course, this is just my opinion, but it would seem that Johnson and Johnson is doing a splendid job of trying to boost Tylenol sales by using a none-too-well-concealed attempt to exploit the anti-opioid jihad that continues to run rampant in the U.S., despite overwhelming evidence that war against pain medications has done very little good and very much harm.

1. Johnson and Johnson tries to modernize. And capitalize.

Maybe the company is trying out a new slogan.

Old: 

No More Tears®

New:

“No More Scruples” 

2. Confusing labels.

There are at least three items on the Tylenol website that suggest that J&J is trying to cash in on the opioid crisis, a big no-no in my book. 

Let’s start with some of the language on the label. It not only makes no sense but, in fact, appears to be self-contradictory. Here is part of it:

(Figure 1) Is Tylenol really useful for post-surgical pain? Source:Tylenol.com

I don’t know what parameters J&J used to make the claim that Tylenol is the “#1 Doctor recommended OTC Brand for Post-Surgical Pain Relief.” Because if you look a little more carefully at the rest of label you’ll run into the following (in much smaller letters):

(Figure 2) Translation:  “Use only as directed. For minor aches and pains.” Image: Tylenol.com

3. You can’t have it both ways.

Perhaps you are now asking yourself, “Hmm. if the stuff is meant to be used for minor aches and pains then how can J&J be touting it as the #1 doctor recommended drug for post-surgical pain? Something doesn’t add up here. Post-surgical pain is usually not “minor.” Perhaps the company can explain which of these statements is true. Is Tylenol really so great for post-op pain, such as that from a knee replacement? Or is it more suitable scraped knee?

Based on my own experience with the stuff I’d rather take this. It won’t make me feel any better, but at least it’s yummy!

Have severe pain after surgery? Ask if the hospital pharmacy carries this. Works about as well and Tylenol, but it tastes better.  Image: Candy Warehouse

4. Bottom feeders and the bottom line.

If you click on an innocuous looking button – CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS – it would seem that the company has finally revealed its intentions. 

$hamless. Source. Tylenol.com

Whoa! Why on earth would a company that makes Tylenol put “opioid-free tablets” in the product description? Here’s my best guess. 

That phrase in the red box cannot be there by accident. Since opioid analgesic pills are now (wrongly) equated with “deadly” J&J probably figured that it could score some cheap points by restating the obvious: Tylenol doesn’t contain any opioid; it never did (1). So consumers should feel perfectly comfortable buying a drug that is strong enough for post-surgical pain (No – it barely works for anything. See Note #2) and safe (It’s not so safe either. See Note #3.)

There sure is a lot of double talk in the Tylenol campaign. It sounds vaguely familiar, the use of trickery – half-truths and partial facts to make a point. Where might we have seen something of this nature? Let me think it over for a moment. 

Oh, yeah. It’s this.

Andrew “Pez Head” Kolodny

 

NOTES:

(1) Exception: tylenol-codeine combinations like Tylenol #3, which are prescription drugs.

(2) The following conclusions were taken from Cochrane reviews of the quality of evidence of efficacy of acetaminophen (or the lack thereof) to treat certain conditions. Originally in the article Tylenol Isn’t So Safe, But At Least It Works, Right?

  •  Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip – “In conclusion, there is little evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions.”
  • Acute and Chronic Lower Back Pain – “We found high-quality evidence that paracetamol (4 g per day) is no better than placebo for relieving acute LBP in either the short or longer term. It also worked no better than placebo on the other aspects studied, such as quality of life and sleep quality.”
  • Back Pain, and Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis – “Paracetamol is ineffective in the treatment of low back pain and provides minimal short term benefit for people with osteoarthritis. These results support the reconsideration of recommendations to use paracetamol for patients with low back pain and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in clinical practice guidelines.”
  • Headaches – The outcome of being pain free or having only mild pain at two hours was reported by 59 in 100 people taking paracetamol 1000 mg...”  but “[the same result was seen in “49 out of 100 people taking placebo.”
  • Colds  “The data in this review do not provide sufficient evidence to inform practice regarding the use of acetaminophen for the common cold in adults.”
  • Fever – “[Tylenol] and ibuprofen lower the child’s temperature and relieve their discomfort.”

So, the only evidence-based indication for the utility of Tylenol (according to Cochrane reviews) is lowering children’s fever. There is no strong evidence that it works well for anything else, although it does seem to amplify the analgesic ability of ibuprofen, and vice versa. 

(2) Dr. Aric Hauseknect, a neurologist and pain management specialist in New York, makes this quite clear when in a 2017 interview. “Tylenol is by far the most dangerous drug ever made.” See (See Pain In The Time Of Opioid Denial: An Interview With Aric Hausknecht, M.D.)

 

8 thoughts on “Josh Bloom Exposes Makers of Tylenol

  1. Suzanne,
    It is imperritative that someone like Josh push my article about the e extreme dangers of using suboxone for cancer pain and chronic pain. Suboxone HAS a ceiling. The patients I speak of cannot handle a ceiling.
    PLEASE READ THE ARTICLE PUSH IT. Sound peer reviewed scientific data is there.
    These anti opiate zealots do not understand what fools they look like to the medical community.
    Thay are to the pain community what Jim Jones was to religion.
    Narcissist sociopaths.

    Like

    1. I can send it t josh and Mia? But it’s just being held here until I can post it as a blog post on this blog, too. I have over 3,000 followers on tuuhis bloiug now! But I just left it here for now because this is where you sent it, ok? Why have you not sent it to josh or George knapp yourself yet?

      Like

    2. (Please read all including tables) Peer Reviewed Oncology – Official Organ of Communication “Moving forward in this climate requires digging through relative scientific journals” Some of the most important discoveries of our time came from discarded, forgotten or misplaced work.

      I was doing some research this weekend and ran across an article from May 2000 that mentions new pain algorithms for fentanyl transdermal  systems and break thru medications. I would like for you to read this article and provide some me feedback.Although the theme of this article is cancer pain it does mention chronic pain both as a reference to cancer pain (efficacy in general) it does mention that pure agonists are prescribed for cancer pain and probably should be for chronic. This is because drugs like suboxone have a dosage ceiling by design. This article (yr. 2000) does not specifically mention  We all know who is cheering for Suboxine/buprenoprine sales.   The article mentions that most pain patients are under medicated and is based on solid evidence found in this article and especially in the references. This is a medically sound article based on years of studies and research. Perhaps you could use some of these references to broaden your currently distributed article.   This is a rich article for me considering I am a chronic pain patient with multiple surgeries and am currently experiencing increased pain. I have not slept all night in about 8 weeks. I  am wakened 3 to 4 times a night by 10+ pain and I am exhausted.  Fortunately,  I have a great pain MD in Atlanta and imaging justifying my pain claims.  I have been with this guy for a year now and will be getting new images this week and an upcoming appointment to review them with my doctor March 7th. I use a moderate dose Fentanyl patch and may just need a different break thru medication. I will say this in conclusion. Based on this one article is medically obvious that forced taper is definitely abusive to people.  If people do not have valid imaging or other confirming tests showing an organic pain causing problem or disease they will be tapered or discharged from pain management practices and opioid prescriptions in today’s climate. The doctor must be able to justify his/her prescription writing.  Insurance companies started requiring imaging before surgeries long ago.  Even dentists must provide images of failed crowns and decay requiring modest repair before they will pay a claim. (My brother is a Dentist)  Tim Mason cc: to self for 

      Liked by 1 person

    3. My response to red on his rejection of article. I also told him that he did not want to use it because HIS name was not on it. I also told him he kept everyone’s name out because he wanted to build a name for HIMSELF ONLY. Tim. PLEASE HELP ME GET THIS OUT THERE. Your friend Tim

      Liked by 1 person

  2. https://www.cancernetwork.com/palliative-and-supportive-care/alternative-algorithm-dosing-transdermal-fentanyl-cancer-related-pain/page/0/1 The article is old but highly revelant. I will attach my thoughts on the paper below.
    (Please read all including tables) Peer Reviewed Oncology – Official Organ of Communication

    “Moving forward in this climate requires digging through relative scientific journals”
    Some of the most important discoveries of our time came from discarded, forgotten or misplaced work.

    I was doing some research this weekend and ran across an article from May 2000 that mentions new pain algorithms for fentanyl transdermal systems and break thru medications. I would like for you to read this article and provide some me feedback.
    Although the theme of this article is cancer pain it does mention chronic pain both as a reference to cancer pain (efficacy in general) it does mention that pure agonists are prescribed for cancer pain and probably should be for chronic. This is because drugs like suboxone have a dosage ceiling by design. This article (yr. 2000) does not specifically mention We all know who is cheering for Suboxine/buprenoprine sales.

    The article mentions that most pain patients are under medicated and is based on solid evidence found in this article and especially in the references. This is a medically sound article based on years of studies and research. Perhaps you could use some of these references to broaden your currently distributed article.

    This is a rich article for me considering I am a chronic pain patient with multiple surgeries and am currently experiencing increased pain. I have not slept all night in about 8 weeks. I am wakened 3 to 4 times a night by 10+ pain and I am exhausted.

    Fortunately, I have a great pain MD in Atlanta and imaging justifying my pain claims. I have been with this guy for a year now and will be getting new images this week and an upcoming appointment to review them with my doctor March 7th.

    I use a moderate dose Fentanyl patch and may just need a different break thru medication.

    I will say this in conclusion. Based on this one article is medically obvious that forced taper is definitely abusive to people. If people do not have valid imaging or other confirming tests showing an organic pain causing problem or disease they will be tapered or discharged from pain management practices and opioid prescriptions in today’s climate. The doctor must be able to justify his/her prescription writing. Insurance companies started requiring imaging before surgeries long ago. Even dentists must provide images of failed crowns and decay requiring modest repair before they will pay a claim. (My brother is a Dentist)

    Tim Mason

    cc: to self for

    Like

  3. I have unearthed an article, long lost in the annals of peer reviewed scientific holy grails.  It deserves repeating and shouting to the highest roof tops.It is everything true and honest about fentanyl, dosing and break thru pain, and the beautiful medicines recommended for break thru pain.It is an article that would AK turning over in his bed like the possessed girl in the Exorcist. Susan and Josh need to revive this article and put it on display like and ancient Egyptian artifact.Coming soon to an inbox near you.Tim MasonResearch Chemist and CCP.Sent from my Samsung Galaxy , an AT&T LTE smartphone

    Liked by 1 person

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