Making Peace With My Pain?


*********PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS MY ORIGINAL ARTICLE!!! WHAT GOT POSTED IN “NTL PAIN REPORT” TODAY (9-22-18), WAS EDITED AND CHANGED INTO SOMETHING ELSE. I’M NOT A WHINER NOR AM I WEAK! I HAVE A VOICE & I’M VERY STRONG!! I SENT IN SOMETHING WRITTEN FROM MY HEART & SOUL. IT’S BEEN CHANGED INTO SOMETHING UNRECOGNIZABLE! THOSE ARE NOT MY WORDS OR THOUGHTS AT ALL. THIS IS MY ORIGINAL ARTICLE AND BELOW, YOU CAN READ MY OWN THOUGHTS AND WORDS:

Hello Luvs,

In this time of uncertainty for chronic and/or intractable pain patients please stop telling us to “make peace with our pain”. Until you have walked in my shoes, do not try to dictate what is best for my situation. If you hurt your back momentarily or you have several aches and pains, then by all means, use “mindfulness”, “accept your pain” and then “make peace with it”. I don’t care what you do with it honestly, but stop telling me/us to “make peace” with now, uncontrolled chronic daily pain at a 7/8, knowing that it’s forever. My health decline has continued year after year with increasing medical issues piled on top of the old injuries; going on 16 years now.

Unless you actually live with daily intractable pain, don’t to tell me/us how to manage it. If you’re a writer, motivational speaker or a politician, stop giving advice when you don’t truly understand the nature of living with 8 chronic pain illnesses. If you have one chronic illness and “accepting the pain” or “making peace” with it works for you, then by all means, go for it!

Let me explain for those who don’t really know the person they are preaching to on social media. It’s not always Psychological, hysterical or a history of abuse that causes ongoing pain. Sometimes things just happen that cause a very strong person to live with very high pain. When that pain gets more complicated and worsens as time goes by, and it is forever; that is when acceptance, making peace with your pain, grounding and mindfulness don’t work very well.

I was a very active single mom with two young daughters. I had a career as an Interpreter for the Deaf at a major University hospital and school districts. I taught aerobics and was the jump rope team’s coach at the Elementary school. I visited different schools to share Deaf culture and American sign language. One day a man ran a red light and changed all of that for me. Afterwards, I worked very hard at 3 years in TBI rehab, 9 years of PT/OT, driver rehabilitation and speech therapy. I ended up with 2 hearing aids and prisms in my glasses for a long time. For 3 years I refused opioid medication due to the stigma or “taboo” of taking it. I did Biofeedback and the red line was “off the charts” showing that my pain was very high and I needed some other intervention. I was the woman who graduated with honors, never drank or smoked. I was not taking that medication. I worked with a pain Psychologist at a pain clinic. I had several epidural nerve blocks, trigger point injections, cortisone injections and other medications(*most either made me violently ill or I was allergic). I endured 8+ surgeries, including 2 screws and a pacemaker with a cardio messenger box next to my bed. They told me to “trust them” and take the opioid pain medication or I was going to stay in that hospital bed in my home. I finally accepted the fact that just as people with hearing loss need hearing aids and those with vision issues wear glasses and Diabetics take insulin; I needed to take pain medication to give me back my life, or some semblance of a life.

For 13 years, I’ve been as active as I can be. I don’t lay in my bed and wallow or feel sorry for myself. I have been a US Pain Ambassador, on the Board of Directors and even won “U.S. Pain Ambassador of the year 2016”. I’m a patient Leader for WEGO Health, have been on 3 different radio shows and I have been a mentor for newly Diagnosed CRPS patients. I have a popular blog and write for National Pain Report. I’ve done many fundraisers, awareness events and still currently lead several online groups while helping several non-profit groups with whatever they need help doing. I live with several high pain chronic illnesses, including: systemic/full body CRPS, EDS type 4/vascular, Chiari (with migraines), Right Long Thoracic Nerve Neuropathy, Autonomic Neuropathy, R.A., Dysautonomia/POTs, Coronary Spasms (Prinzmetal Angina), Degenerative Disc Disease with multiple herniate and bulging discs, Spinal Stenosis, Chronic erosive Gastritis, Gastroparesis, SIBO and multiple heart issues.

I’m at 25% of of what I was taking for the past 13 years. Two of my specialists wrote letters on my behalf, to my pain Dr.; explaining that with the multiple illnesses that I live with, the patch is and has been proven to be the very best thing that works for my pain. One of my specialist physicians wrote “why break what doesn’t need fixed? She’s been active and doing so well and this could land her inpatient and in declining health”. My pain Dr. said “this is Bullshit, his license is not any better than mine. If he wants you to have the patch then let him prescribe it”.

I continue to be quickly tapered against my will. I’m in my “Lazy Boy” recliner 16-18 hours every day.

This is what my “forever” is looking like now. I went from teaching aerobics, American Sign Language, being the Elementary schools’, Jump Rope Team coach and an active mother and then grandmother, to “living” in a recliner daily. I’m not focusing on the pain, in fact I’ve done everything to not focus on it. I went through 43 hours of labor and then a C-section, twice; while being sent home with Motrin 800 per my own choice. I’m not a “baby”, nor am I an “addict”. In fact I have a letter from the Pain Psychologist, stating that I “do not have an addictive personality”. So stop telling me to plant my feet (with open sores on them, by the way) into the earth to practice “grounding”. Don’t tell me to “make peace with my pain” or accept it; unless or until you have walked one full day in my shoes! If you haven’t experienced pain on these levels, then stop preaching to the choir. I, for one am getting very tired of defending myself and the rest of the pain community on the subject of opioid pain medication therapy. It does work for some of us just as Insulin helps the Diabetic to continue living.

**The Article Ed edited & changed totally & which appeared to be written by an illiterate 5th grader. Is in its entirety at the Ntl pain Report but for your convenience I’ve recopied what Ed Coghlan wrote in place of what I had sent to him:

Making Peace With Pain (by: Ed Coghlan)

Please stop telling me to make peace with my pain.

I can’t right now and haven’t been able to do for many years.

And it’s getting worse.

My health decline has continued year after year with increasing medical issues piled on top of the old injuries; going on 16 years now. If you have daily intractable pain, you know what I’m talking about.

It is not always psychological, hysterical or a history of abuse that causes ongoing pain. Sometimes you just hurt—a lot.

I was once a very active single mom with two young daughters. I had a career as an Interpreter for the Deaf at a major University hospital and school districts. I taught aerobics and was the jump rope team’s coach at the Elementary school. I visited different schools to share Deaf culture and American sign language.

Then a man ran a red light and changed my life. I have endured 8+ surgeries, including 2 screws and a pacemaker with a cardio messenger box next to my bed. They told me to “trust them” and take the opioid pain medication or I was going to stay in that hospital bed in my home. I said ok

For 13 years, I’ve been as active as I can be. I have been active with a national pain advocacy group and I contribute to the National Pain Report and have worked to advance the wants and desires of the millions of people like me—people who suffer from this cruel condition.

This “reduction” in opioid prescribing has hit me hard. I’m taking  about 25% of what I was taking for the past thirteen years. Specialists who treat me have written letters to my pain doctor explaining that with the multiple illnesses I live with, the patch is the best thing for me. My pain doctor, feeling the pressure of the CDC guideline, refused to do it.

Now I’m in a “Lazy Boy” recliner 16 hours a day because I’m being tapered against my will.

Not what I want. Not what I’ve been.

I could tell you much more, but if you’re like me, you know.

It’s not fair.

Suzanne Stewart is a chronic pain patient (and advocate) who lives in Michigan. She is a contributor to the National Pain Report.

***Lastly,

This Bio which is usually on all of my NPR articles, is missing today….. here’s what it normally says:

Suzanne has lived with a Systemic CRPS & several other chronic pain illnesses since a MVA in 2002. Prior to being disabled from chronic pain, she was an Interpreter for the Deaf at a hospital & worked with Deaf children. Since 2005, Suzanne’s been a patient Health advocate, support group leader & Mentor.  She continues doing these things today, but also does public speaking, awareness events and she’s a Writer/blogger & an Ambassador for the U.S. Pain Foundation. The statements and opinions that she provides are her own and should not be taken as the stance, position or viewpoint of the U.S. Pain Foundation. For entertainment she creates advocacy videos & uplifting ASL cover song videos on You tube and she writes in her own blog Tears Of Truth. You can follow her here: TearsofTruth.com

This was my photo + Bio on them”staff columnists” Page under the “Our Team” Tab.

This is the email I rec’d from Ed Coghlan, after I was trying to let him know how upset I was that he “gutted” my (this) article. He added words that I hadn’t written. He changed the powerful message that was in my original story; to one of weakness and whining! Needless to say, I don’t want to write for someone that would call this an “edit”. Then send me an email at 12:05 AM, saying that he was going to publish this article in the morning (6 hours later); without ever allowing me to see the “edits”! I finally asked if I could please see the final copy and about 1:00-1:30 AM, I received the skeleton of my former original article. I begged him not to post it as it was. He’d gone to bed and scheduled it to post at 6:00 am! I was getting all kinds of comments from persons who recognize my writing when they see it and when they don’t! The rest is history!

PS- Btw, he couldn’t get hold of me on Saturday because I have recently been quickly tapered against my will; from my LA/ER pain medication that I’d been taking since 2005. I was in horrible pain from the added emotional strain from my resignation from US Pain Foundation Board of Directors & from USPF. Then the very next day this happened.

My husband called Ed in my place because I’m conscientious and would never just not respond. He told my husband that “he was not comfortable talking with him”! Well he’s also my caregiver and I wasn’t able to speak at that point. It all came tumbling down!

All You Ever Wanted to Know About S.I.B.O.


S.I.B.O – Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (A Chronic small intestine infection)

1) Definition and description of the disorder: (*This is from the info that the Dr’s office gave to me): Simply put, Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth is a chronic bacterial infection of the small intestine. The infection is of bacteria that normally live in the Gastrointestinal tract but have abnormally overgrown in a location not meant for so many bacteria.

2) What people are saying?: I posted an article on National pain report here:

http://nationalpainreport.com/sibo-the-missing-piece-of-chronic-pain-dysautonomia-8832039.html

**Most people have been saying that they have had problems like this for up to 20 years but had no idea what it was. They took my article to their Dr and their Dr’s did not know what it was for most. But some who went to specialist GI Dr’s, got the Breath test done and then they were diagnosed and helped. There are many comments following this article, of other things people are saying about “SIBO”. Also, people have gone months, years or decades before ever getting a proper diagnosis. It is known from what little research exists, that tress, trauma, autoimmune illnesses and more, can contribute to the symptoms of SIBO.

3). Symptoms: gas/expel flatus, within Small Intestine. The gas causes abdominal bloating, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea or both (similar to symptoms of IBS). Excess gas can also cause belching and flatulence. Also symptoms include painful and bloated abdomen

(*looking and feeling like a 3-5 most pregnancy), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, malnutrition, weight loss, joint pain, fatigue and chronic fatigue.

4). Possible co-morbidities: People with SIBO normally have illnesses such as Dysautonomia and/or Autoimmune illnesses. This is information given to me at the Dr.’s office. But on the website listed below, on weebly.com, it is noted that There are many conditions associated with SIBO including: diabetes, scleroderma, Crohn’s disease, and others. There is a striking similarity between the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome(IBS) and SIBO. It has been theorized that SIBO may be responsible for the symptoms of at least some people diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. Autoimmune nerve damage to the small intestine is frequently a cause of SIBO.

5) Treatment Options: The treatment for SIBO is a 7-10 day course of antibiotics. They do treat the infection and so the symptoms disappear for awhile. The problems lie in that the disease that causes SIBO can’t be corrected at times. The symptoms return frequently, once the antibiotics are stopped. Some patients need to be treated with antibiotics repeatedly or even continuously. Some readily available probiotics used are: VSL#3 or FLORA-Q, but their effectiveness has not been proven. Also, Bifidobacterium infants 35624 is the only probiotic that has actually proven helpful in treating symptoms of IBS and SIBO.

6). FDA Approved medications: the approved medication for SIBO is antibiotic therapy. Also, a dietary supplement called “Allign” is often given in conjunction with the antibiotics. It is a probiotic which can help alleviate some of the bacterial overgrowth.

7) Complimentary Therapies: Allign is an OTC probiotic, that does alleviate some of the symptoms and some of the bacteria. Also, eating probiotic yogurts daily, will help cut down the occurrences of SIBO. Meditation and Guided imagery have been helpful in relieving some of the stress in the body and gut.

8) Best Nutrition: The best nutrition is to make sure that you eat yogurt and any other dietary items with probiotics in them.

*FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) are found in certain foods that are commonly poorly absorbed and fermented in people with IBS and SIBO, so restricting them can be very helpful. *there is a resource below that will help you with this and explain more about FODMAPs.

9) Best exercise regime: This can be difficult because what they have found is that exercise in any rigorous manner can actually worsen the symptoms of SIBO. But a healthy diet and walking 30 minutes daily for most of the days of the week, do help the symptoms of SIBO.

10) Local Support Groups: Right now there are only 4 support groups in the USA. They are NYC SIBO Support group, SIBO Support Group Los Angeles and the Portland, OR SIBO support group. There are several online support groups on Yahoo groups and on Facebook. The most well known for being a “good” support group, according to the article in #4 below in “informational resources”, is here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/470628319710443/

11) Links to other organizations and websites and additional info:

A) https://sibocenter.com/2016/02/resources/

B) http://www.Siboinfo.com

C) https://cemoodle.nunm.edu/

12) Personal Story for Someone to Connect with: I have had GI problems for many years and after 2002, when I was in a “catastrophic” motor vehicle accident, they increased. I had tried about 4 different GI Dr’s, but none of them could figure out what was wrong with me exactly.

They kept telling me it was “IBS”, but I knew it was something much more and different from that. IBS is enough to deal with and a horrible problem, but I was having even more serious issues. I finally found a wonderful GI Dr in Michigan. He did some tests that the others had not done. One of the tests was called a “Hydrogen Breath test” and the other was a digestive test for Gastroparesis. It turns out that I have both the SIBO and the Gastroparesis, along with Chronic Erosive Gastritis. I felt bloated and looked a few months pregnant and was having a lower abdomen burning sensation. Now I take monthly antibiotics, or pretty much monthly. I have to rotate with 3 different kinds of Antibiotics because they don’t work well if you become immune to the same one often. I stuck it out and did not give up until I found a Dr. Who would actually listen to me and not dismiss my issues, because I have so many and because I’m a “complicated case. Now I try to eat a probiotic yogurt daily and I cannot take the “Allign” due to a heart problem called “Long QT syndrome”, as it interferes with that. But I do have to take the antibiotics and I have found some relief with online and Facebook support groups for general pain issues and now one for SIBO too. I have listed everything for you above or below. I wrote an article that I have posted above for you, in the National Pain Report last year. When people commented, I was amazed at how many people had the same symptoms and no relief. Many people told me that they printed out the article and took it to their GI or PC Dr’s, and they were tested with the simple Breath test. They have also found some relief and for that I am extremely happy. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask?

13). Graphics:

A). There are some YouTube videos here:

1: Youtube video: On SIBO from Gastroenterologists : (Digestive disease week 2012)

2: Youtube video: Info about Gut Bacteria & SIBO

INFORMATIONAL RESOURCES:

1) Information on SIBO

2) also from a handout from GI Dr’s office in MI, called “Overview-SIBO-Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth” (the handout was found at: EE Website : Brochure about SIBO

3) IBS & SIBO INFO

4) Start a SIBO Support Group

5) Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth, the case of the perpetual patient : The case of the perpetual patient

All You Ever Wanted To Dysautonomia


Definition:

  1. Dysautonomia refers to a malfunction or disorder of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). This is usually involves failure of the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system; but it can also mean that the ANS may be overactive. Dysautonomia refers to the “involuntary” systems of the body. This can include: body temperature, blood pressure, respiratory/breathing, sleep, heart rate and more. Dysautonomia can be considered “Local” as it is in many cases of CRPS, or it can be a total Autonomic failure. Sometimes Dysautonomia is considered to be “acute” and reversible. Other times it may be chronic and progressive (as in Diabetes or Parkinson’s). A person may be diagnosed with Dysautonomia by itself, as a condition. It can also be associated with degenerative and neurological diseases. Dyauatonomia is actually an “Umbrella term” used to describe many different issues that occur due to the malfunction of the Autonomic Nervous System.Lastly, Dysautonomia is responsible for our “fight-or- flight” response. This is what gets our body ready for stressful situations. When the nerves of the ANS are damaged, you can get Autonomic Neuropathy as well. These dysfunctions can range from mild to life threatening.
  2. What People Are Saying: people are saying that Dysautonomia is a common ailment among people with autoimmune illnesses, CRPS, Chiari, Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and even Diabetes. The most common symptoms that people in the chronic pain community speak about is a fall in blood pressure during standing or “Orthostatic Hypertension” or a rapid pulse rate. Other things that are said about Dysautonomia are that it causes abnormal sweating, emotional instability and motor incoordination.
  3. Symptoms: Some symptoms of Dysautonomia *(aka Autonomic nerve disorders) are: syncope (fainting), Orthostatic Hypotension and/or intolerance, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome), Gastroparesis, Intestinal Dysmotility, constipation, Erectile daysfunction and neurogenic bladder. Other symptoms include: fatigue, light-headedness, weakness and cognitive impairment. In Dysautonomia involving the Gastrointestinal tract, the patients often feels nausea, bloating, vomiting and abdominal pain, when the ANS malfunctions.
  4. Possible comorbidities: Possible illnesses that go along with Dysautonomia can include: CRPS, EDS, Chiari, Gastroparesis, Autoimmune illnesses, Lupus, POTS, NCS (Neurocardiogenic Syncope). Other co-morbidities include: Multiple Sclerosis, RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis), Celiac Disease, Autonomic Neuropathy & Sjogren’s Syndrome etc. The worst form of Dysautonomia, which is a fatal form that occurs in adults ages 40 and up, is called MSA. This means, “Multiple System Atrophy”. It is similar to Parkin-son’s disease but MSA patients become fully bedridden wishing 2 years of diagnosis. But please note that this is very, very rare and only about 350,000 people have the MSA form, worldwide.
  5. Treatment options: There is no cure currently for Dysautonomia at this time but secondary forms can improve with treatments for the underlying disease. You can help the Orthostatic hypotension by elevating the head of the bed, rapid water infusion (given rapidly in an IV) and eating a higher salt diet. Other treatments may include exercise and healthy diet.
  6. FDA approved medications: Midodrine is an FDA approved medication that helps with the syncope and collapse.
  1. Complimentary Therapies: Biofeedback and exercise with the right amount of salt may help some of the symptoms of Dysautonomia. Biofeedback can teach you how to calm yourself of anxiety which often comes with this illness. There was a Webinar back in early Winter 2017, that US Pain hosted. It was about “Earthing” or “Grounding (”http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads%2Fi-think-earthing-cured-my-dysautonomia-pots.24992%2F and this therapy has been known to help this person; who wrote her experiences about “Grounding” helping her symptoms of Dysautonomia. *I was also prescribed a “cooling vest” to help with the feeling of overheating inside of my body
  2. Best nutrition: higher salt intake and staying hydrated are the two most important things to remember with Dysautonomia and nutrition.
  3. Best exercise regime: Exercise can be difficult when you feel very fatigued and barely able to stand at times. Also, you need to get the permission of your Physicians before starting any exercise program. Also, staying hydrated while increasing aerobic exercise, lower extremity strengthening, increasing fluid/salt intake and psychophysiologic training for management of pain and anxiety, along with family education. People also say that exercise intolerance is part of Dysautonomia but it is essential to helping with it. Start off slowly and avoid exercises that cause orthostatic stress. This includes minimal or no vertical movement, including rowing, recumbent biking or swimming.
  1. . Local Support groups: Local support groups can be found at the website: “Dysautonomia International”, here: Dysautonomia International and you may email Dysautonomia International at: info@dysautonomia for online support group resources. They do not verify the accuracy of information posted in the groups*.
  2. . Links to other organizations and websites and additional info: The best website with a lot of information here: ( Dysautonomia International ) at “Dysautonomia International”. They have links to support groups and online support, as well as diet and exercise tips.
  3. : Personal story for someone to connect with: Dysautonomia is something that I was likely born with. I was involved and injured in two automobile accidents that have inevitably made it much worse. First in 1983, I was hit by a drunk driver while sitting at a red stop light. Secondly, in 2002, a man in a pickup truck, ran through a red light and I suffered multiple injuries and had many surgeries. I also suffered an MTBI or “MildTraumatic Brain Injury”. One of my treatment team of Dr.’s is a Neurocardiologist, and he told me that my Dysautonomia was made much worse due to the “sloshing” of my cerebellum against the skull wall. I do have severe systemic CRPS, Chiari, RA, Autonomic Neuropathy, Polyneuropathy in Collagen Vascular Disease (aka EDS type 4/vascular) and Gastroparesis. These are all hallmarks of the umbrella illness of Dysautonomia. Following the auto accident in 2002, I was fainting quite often. We found out that my brain was not telling my heart what to do, because I have Autonomic Nervous System Failure. I ended up requiring a dual changer pacemaker. It now does 87% of the work for my heart. I am very lucky to have found a wonderful specialist in Dr. Blair Grubb, MD at the University of Toledo Medical Center. He is known around the world as far away as the UK!

**Various other personal stories for me are found here at my blog “Tears of Truth” and at: tearsoftruth.com:

A). Dysautonomia/POTS & S.I.B.O. and this one: Article about Dysautonomia/POTS & SIBO

B). Another article for you!Https://Wordpress.com/post/tearsoftruth.com/9263

Helpful YouTube Videos:

A. Dysautonomia/POTS

B.Dr Blair Grubb on POTs

***Informational Sources:

1. Dictionary.com on Dysautonomia

2. Medical News Today in Dysautonomia

3. Dysautonomia International

4. http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads%2Fi-think-earthing-cured-my-dysautonomia-pots.24992%2F

5. Dysautonomia International more on Dysautonomia

6. Mayo Clinic on Dysautonomia

7. Healthline.com on Dysautonomia

8. Clevland Clinic on Dysautonomia

9.WordPress blog “Tears of Truth” on Dysautonomias

Letter To Leaders of Oregon Forced Taper


Below I’ve copied the letter that I wrote to the leaders of the state of Oregon, regarding their new proposal for forced taper off of all opioids in their state:

To Leaders of the state of Oregon,

I am writing to you with a plea for all of your constituents, as well the entire chronic pain population in the USA. What you are proposing to do, by eliminating opioids, is considered torture by the World Health Organization. You are also setting a precedent for other states, if this action against all opioids goes through!

When I’m proposing a big change, even just in my own household; I try to put myself in the place of other family members that my change will affect. Please put yourself in the “shoes (so to speak)”, of the thousands & later on, millions of chronic pain patients that you’ll be affecting and in reality, torturing. If you remove all opioids from your state, the suicide rate will increase dramatically and many intractable pain patients and their families will suffer.

Please think about what you are doing to trauma victims, burn victims and people with horrible chronic pain illnesses and cancer. Would you want to suffer with daily horrible pain, or would you want to take something that has been working for possibly even a decade (or more); to give you some semblance of a life with your children, grandchildren and/or your family. 

Please reconsider this act of cruelty and torture on those living with chronic pain in your state (& then future areas as well).

Thank you for reading my letter and I truly hope that your conscience will help you make the right decision for people who live with pain 365/24/7. Also remember that it could be you or your child, wife or parent at any time. We never know from day to say, what might happen. One minute I was sipping lemonade at an art fair; the next moment, I was hit by a car when the driver ran through a red light. This started my life of pain and I never could have imagined what this new life would be like.

Peace & Hope,

Suzanne Stewart

**Below is a photo screenshot that I took Of the reply that I received back from them:

Becoming Incurable Crowdfunding Campaign


Please watch this short video and see how this film producer is bringing awareness of Chronic pain and Chronic illnesses to the big screen!

If you prefer to visit my advocacy YouTube Channel to watch this, you can visit: WWW.YouTube.Com/Suzydukettes….

BUT my newest Youtube video is right here for you to watch -and it’s only about 4 minutes Long: I hope you will enjoy, learn & help in any way possible with the crowdfunding campaign, at: http://www.seedandspark.com/fund/becomingincurable

Here is a very short 4 minute video: (Thank you for Watching):

Becoming Incurable Crowdfunding Video

Forest Is One Tree That Will Not Fall Without Being Heard!


Hello Luvs,

I just wanted to get something up today that would let many more people know & learn about Dr. Forest Tennant. I want everyone to know what is happening to this good man; this awesome wonderful doctor and friend of mine. I’m working on my own blog post but I wanted this up so that you could learn quickly and start helping. I want you to learn about Dr. Tennant and what he does for people. He helps the sickest of the sick. He helps people that other doctors don’t want to be bothered with; they just want to throw them away! Dr. Tennant is a good man and he doesn’t deserve what is happening to him. What’s happening now, is like what we think might happen in some Third World country!! Our country is changing for the worse! This isn’t the USA I ever remember and loved! What’s happening is fear mongering, craziness, bullying, and who knows what else?

Dr. Jeffrey Fudin, is a very close friend of Dr. Forest Tennant. I asked him if I could re-post this story from his blog today. He gave me permission to do so. I need to make sure you know that I did not write this piece. It is totally all Dr. Fudin’s writing & work here today except for this introduction. Please visit his blog @Paindr.com :

**(Copied with permission from Dr Jeffry Fudin, B.S., Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP)

Diplomate, American Academy of Pain Management

#DropTheTennantCase

Forest is one tree that will not fall without being heard:

I was shocked to learn of the Gestapo tactics the DEA organized in the attack against Dr. Forest Tennant.  What kind of world do we live in? I am not at all surprised however to see the outrage amongst my peers to rise up in support of Dr. Tennant’s well-mannered and careful dedication to his patients. When asked an open-ended question by a prominent professional group regarding this mockery, my first response was, “Perhaps the DEA did the world a favor – this time they screwed with the wrong person and their bungling actions will reverberate pervasively.” I suspect almost every leading pain clinician scholar will line up to offer expert witness services in support of Dr. Tennant should the DEA contemptuous actions against Dr. Tennant ever make it to court.

If anybody Tweets, posts, or shares any comment on social media, please include this hashtag, #DropTheTennantCase.

In the last few hours we already see two posts, The DEA Raids the Offices of My Friend and Colleague, Dr. Tennant and DEA Raids Dr. Forest Tennant’s Pain Clinic. Keep them coming and be sure to add #DropTheTennantCase.

Dr. Morty Fein was kind enough to provide some backdrop and clever insight to the alternative news associated with the DEA raid on Dr. Tennant and the patients the patients and community that will be harmed as a result.

Here’s what he had to say in his piece entitled,

The Fifth Vital ….Sigh

When there is regime change there is often a purge of anything and everything associated with the prior (often disgraced) movement and its rulers. History gets rewritten and we move on to a new and improved world. In pain politics, the opiophiles have been replaced by the opiophobes in power and every remnant of prior rule, every concept and tenet ends up getting dragged through the mud and discarded. Sigh.

Witness what has happened to the notion of pseudoaddiction. It has been ridiculed without a critical look at its continued importance. Because an executive from a company accused (often correctly but just as often overzealously) of overzealous marketing of opioids wrote an “n of 1 paper” based on a sincere and accurate appraisal of a troubling observation during his early years of pain practice – many years before he left practice and became an executive – the notion has been tied to overpromotion of opioids in the media and by opiophobes. Never mind the fact that the notion is even more important now since the stingy approach to opioid availability is daily leading to even worse pain control for millions and in turn causing desperation. And desperation can lead to people acting in ways that are uncharacteristic of them and their behavior construed as a sign of addiction. Happens every day. Often. Several authors, including the original authors, have over the years written about the need to re-evaluate the concept; not the validity of the observation but in what clinicians need to do to safely respond to it. The answer is not the knee jerk raising of opioid doses that became a bit of a caricature during the early days of the opiophile revolution, but a reappraisal of the totality of the patient’s pain regimen and approach and a sincere respect for the fact that a person taking liberties with their opioids or augmenting with anything including street drugs can indeed trigger a behavioral loss of control that needs to be addressed and not solely relying on improved analgesia to stop the behavior. Loss of control and uncontrolled pain are not mutually exclusive. Regardless of what drives the drug taking behavior and loss of control, abuse and even overdose can result. Perhaps this is why lowering MSEs nationally is not decreasing the number of opioid overdoses and in fact they are increasing them. The notion is self-effacing for us HCPs – that it is our failure to control pain that can drive the desperation and we have the responsibility to help fix it and the behavioral syndrome accompanying it – if anyone has the time and reimbursement anymore in our healthcare system for this much soul-searching and critical thought. Sigh.

And of course, the pain as the 5th vital sign movement has also been ridiculed as a simple ploy by pharma to lead to more pain assessment solely because it would lead to the more opioid prescribing not to simply bring pain and suffering out of the shadows and raise awareness. Outrageous and laughable contend the opiophobes. That people suffer in silence, that they are afraid to tell their health care providers, that unless they are asked they will often assume that discussion of their pain is not the purview of the providers with whom they are interacting is a trite every day observation doesn’t prevent throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Pain as a 5th vital sign is a movement about communication not treatment. Let us not go back to the bad old days of don’t ask don’t tell about pain and suffering. Want to change the name of it? Fine. But we shouldn’t stop efforts to ask about our patients’ experiences of suffering. We should avoid knee jerk reactions driving what we are going to do about it. Simply because someone reports their pain as “8 out of 10” doesn’t mean we should knee jerk raise their opioid dose nor should we knee jerk increase the frequency of their meditation sessions. It requires time and thought and a self-effacing attitude that we can do better for the person and a commitment to do better for the person. If anyone has the time and reimbursement anymore in our healthcare system for this much soul-searching and critical thought. Sigh.

And while we are on the subject of regime change, some of the most expert, most ethical and most erudite former leaders in the opioid movement are being dragged through the mud and the legal system on virtually a daily basis nationwide, tormented by district attorneys and ambulance chasers who would beg any one of them to care for them or their family members if they were stricken with severe and unrelenting chronic pain. Virtually everything they ever wrote, said or did being misportayed and  misrepresented as they get held responsible for consequences of treatments that occurred in jurisdictions they never set foot in. As if writing or talking or doing everything they could for opioid safety was just a ploy for pharma to push more drugs. No, it was a move to try to help others if they were going to do opioid therapy to adopt a seriousness and responsibility and acquire expertise like their own. They may have overestimated the integrity of their peers that went on to run pill mills but they never advocated for pill mills. They may have underestimated the size of the gap between their own expertise and that of their brethren that would try to emulate them. But they never advocated for carelessness or lack of responsibility. They wanted us all to take a self-effacing (i.e. that we all need to learn more about pain) and responsible and thoughtful approach. As if anyone has the time and reimbursement anymore in our healthcare system for this much soul-searching and critical thought. Sigh.

This brings me to the raiding of the home and practice of the beloved and venerated Dr. Forest Tennant. His Thanksgiving gift was a storm trooper’s boot in his door – by a cop who has a better sense of what the doctor’s patients need than the doctor (with 50 years plus of experience) does. And who I am certain would beg Dr. Tennant to care for him and his family if they were stricken with unrelenting chronic pain.  Dr. Tennant called them and their scare tactics out in an interview right after the events and he intends to fight. Be Brave! Don’t run Forest, don’t run!

Free the Opioid 5 I say.

It is time to stand and fight. Regime change and the re-writing of history must stop now. Our support for these 5 is vital. Sigh.

This is taken with permission, from the Blog of Dr. Jeffry Fudin @paindr.com and here’s the link: http://paindr.com/forest-is-one-tree-that-will-not-fall-without-being-heard/

Here’s some information about Dr Fudin. This information was taken directly from his own website/Blog , also at paindr.com…. I didn’t want to get anything wrong and so this too, is directly copied from his Blog. All rights are reserved by him and everything here today is all his work and his writing and not mine! Please read about Dr Fudin:

Jeffrey Fudin, B.S., Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP

Diplomate, American Academy of Pain Management

Founder & Chair, PROMPT (Professionals for Rational Opioid Monitoring & Pharmacotherapy)

Owner & Managing Editor, PainDr.com

Director, Scientific and Clinical Affairs, REMITIGATE, LLC in Delmar NY

Director PGY2 Pain Residency Stratton VA Medical Center in Albany NY

Adjunct Associate Professor, Western New England University College of Pharmacy

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy

Section Editor, Pain Medicine

Dr. Fudin graduated from Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences with his Bachelors Degree and Pharm.D. He completed an Oncology/Hematology fellowship at SUNY/Upstate Medical Center.  He is a Diplomate to the American Academy of Pain Management and a Fellow of both the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the American Society of Health-system Pharmacists.

Dr. Fudin is a Section Editor for Pain Medicine, Founder/Chairman of Professionals for Rational Opioid Monitoring & Pharmacotherapy, and peer reviewer for several professional journals.   He has participated in developing practice guidelines for use of opioids in chronic noncancer pain (APS, AAPM collaborative) and participated in national and international guideline development for arthritis, fibromyalgia, and palliative Care. He has also participated in the development and co-author guidelines for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. He is consultant to a national panel to develop consensus guidelines for the proper use of urine testing in addiction medicine, a collaborative effort with the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP), Center for Lawful Access and Abuse Deterrence (CLAAD), and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). And he is a panel member for new urine test guidelines under development by the American Academy of Pain Medicine.

Dr. Fudin is President and Director for Scientific and Clinical Affairs for REMITIGATE, LLC, a software development company specializing in opioid safety. He practices as a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist and Director, PGY-2 Pharmacy Pain Residency Programs at the Stratton Veterans Administration Medical Center in Albany NY.  He holds adjunct faculty positions at University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Western New England University College of Pharmacy in Springfield MA, and Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.  Dr. Fudin has been an invited speaker on pain management nationally and internationally.

Dr. Fudin is founder and Chair of Professionals for Rational Opioid Monitoring and Pharmacotherapy (PROMPT), owner and managing editor for paindr.com and founder of Remitigate LLC, a software development company that has launched an application to help clinicians interpret urine drugs screens with several pipeline products including a pharmacogenetic applications and other opioid safety software initiatives.  He is a prolific lecturer, writer, and researcher on pain management topics and he served as a Task Force member for the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS) for role delineation study/practice analysis of pain and palliative care pharmacy. He was awarded the American Academy of Pain Medicine’s Presidential Commendation in 2014, in recognition as “a voice for scientific integrity and an advocate for people in pain.”

Never Judge By Outward Appearances 




During this September 2017, we have been urged by the U.S. Pain Foundation, to share our story on social media.  I was reluctant to do this, but then I decided to share after a mini documentary that my husband & I were involved in was released.  Let me explain:

I was recently involved in a video on Social media, called “Becoming Incurable”, directed & produced by Victoria Suan.  I’ve had several people see that video, which shows only a minuscule piece, of one very small illness that I live with.  People saw me with a nebulizer and now think I have only Asthma.  Asthma isn’t fun even on its own. But between this and seeing me involved with the U.S. Pain Foundation during Pain Awareness Month especially;  many people are assuming things that shouldn’t be assumed.  None of us like being assessed by what we look like on the outside; with regards to Invisible illnesses.  Several persons have told me that they “wish they only had what I have”.  Others have said that “they wish they could do more & be involved more, like I am able to do “. 

My name is Suzanne and I have been disabled since 1999; 1st from PTSD and stage two chronic Kidney disease. In August 2002, I was in a motor vehicle accident which caused multiple injuries,including:   a Traumatic brain injury, hearing loss (I acquired 2 hearing aids), vision lessened & eye issues, many (approximately 8) surgeries, & 3 years of TBI rehab. I still suffer with short term memory loss and other effects from the TBI.  In 2003, I had to have a dual chamber pacemaker placed for “Sick Sinus Syndrome”  (it is a Bradycardia/Tachycardia Arrythmia), along with Dysautonomia/POTS.  After seven or eight surgeries and a pacemaker, I was diagnosed with” Complex Regional
Pain Syndrome”, in 2007. It started in my right foot after surgery and it spread over the years to both feet & knees.

 In 2005, I had an M. I. or heart attack. In 2006 after the heart attack, I was diagnosed with Atrial fibrillation and was put on Blood thinners. But, I suffered a CVA/stroke in 2006. I have Mitral valve prolapse, Tricuspid valve prolapse, mild Pulmonary Valve Hypertension, 

In 2013, I had to have pacemaker replacement surgery (my first pacemaker was placed in 2003). When the Heart Surgeon got inside of my chest, they found that the entire pectoral muscle had to be totally rebuilt. The old pacemaker had been placed in the muscle instead of inside of a bag near the muscle. Over 10 years, It wore a hole right through my pectoral muscle and then had to be rebuilt during a long surgery, which was a very painful recovery afterwards. The Dr. informed me that aside from the Systemic CRPS, the continuing post surgical pain and Lymphedema in my left arm, is similar to the pain that occurs after a mastectomy.  Though, I did not have a Mastectomy.  

 The surgeon, a Neurocardiologist, had researched RSD/CRPS & did an internal surgical wash of Bipvucaine to try and “head off”systemic CRPS, & prevent it from spreading. It ended up being unsuccessful and the CRPS progressed into “Severe, Systemic/Full body CRPS”. It’s spread everywhere including my eyes and my mouth.  

 I have a few other chronic pain illnesses, including: CKDII, Arnold Chiari Malformation I (with Chiari Migraines),
Degenerative Disc Disease, RA, OA, Gastroparesis, S.I.B.O., Chronic Erosive Gastritis, Autonomic Neuropathy, Polyneuropathy in Collagen Vascular Disease (EDS-4/vascular), multiple herniated & bulging discs (with L4-5 Radiculopathy) at L4,L5& S1 + C5,C6 & C7. CID (Combined Immunodeficiency Disease/an Autoimmune disease), Eczema, Prinzmetal Angina (aka “Coronary Spasms”), Lymphedema, Scoliosis, Asthma, CAD, Right Long Thoracic Nerve Neuropathy, Severe Dry Eye, and just too much to mention here today! But you get the idea!  

I’m not the only one! There are so many chronic pain warriors with a list as long or longer!  I’m not a candidate for a Spinal cord Stimulator or an Intrathecal pain pump, because of my “Combined Immune Deficiency Disease”. It could cause paralysis and/or infection in my Spinal cord. So I’m limited in what I can do for my chronic pain. I’m one in a group of chronic pain patients, who has had to resort to taking pain medications. But in doing this, I can have some semblance of a life outside of my bed or the sofa. Believe me, since 2002, I’ve tried many, many medications starting with Lyrica & Gabapentin. I went through 8 years of physical therapy. I had to go to TBI rehabilitation for 3 years. I’ve had many braces, therapies, tests, TENS unit (prior to the CRPS) and more! Depending on the day & how much I need to do; I have:  hand braces, arm sleeve covers, 2 knee braces,     2 AFO’s, a wheelchair, Motorized scooter, walker and a cane. Right now the pain medications are what give me the ability to do some activities outside of my home, bed or sofa.  

 This is my story…. it’s  the “Readers Digest” short version.. It’s a long arduous and continuing saga of chronic pain and surgeries. But I just don’t give up HOPE. I make it a Verb and try to change negatives
into positives. Rather than do nothing, I try to do something. For fun, I make You Tube Videos of my favorite songs or stories translated into American Sign Language (@ASLSuzyQ).

 I’m an Ambassador for the U.S. Pain Foundation. I write in my blog, “Tears of Truth” @tearsoftruth.com. I am a writer
for the National Pain Report.  I also founded & run a few support groups for chronic pain & RSD/CRPS.  I’m also a chemo-angel. I am part of a collaboration group to help with the Opioid crisis (the crisis being the lack of Opioids now & the government taking pain meds away from legitimate chronic pain patients).  I am a patient leader for WEGO Health and a mentor for newly DX CRPS patients for RSDSA.  Setting all of this aside, just as one of my previous blog posts/ news articles states: “There are no competitions and no winners!”  (Can be read in this blog or here at the Ntl. pain Report: http://nationalpainreport.com/no-competition-no-winners-8833089.html)

In July 2017, I was certified by the U. S. Pain Foundation, to lead an “in-person” Support Group. Without having my wonderful, loving husband/caregiver, Craig; my loving U.S. Pain Foundation Family, my WEGO health friends, my friends, family and my writing, I’d be lost in all of this. 

Here’s the link to my Facebook page for this blog. This link takes you directly to the video called “The Incurables”:  https://www.facebook.com/TearsofTruth.SuzanneStewart/posts/1943805715875595