The Art Of Learning Compassion


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We are in a group doing role playing above


Beds were brought in for people who needed to lay down awhile. That’s me with the blue blanket on the bed!! Isn’t that so thoughtful, accommodating and awesome? The US Pain Foundation did this for us!
Hello Luvs,

I wanted to write something about my experiences this past weekend when my husband and I went to Connecticut.  I was invited to go to a weekend seminar to learn how to be a “support group leader” and how to host an “in-person” support group for people living with chronic pain . I was a bit nervous at first because going on even a short trip is difficult for those of us who live with debilitating chronic pain on a daily basis. We worry about being in pain far from the comfort of our recliner, bed or even our own home.  There are worries about taking medications or durable medical equipment on a trip or to a hotel. Then we worry about the airplane ride or the long car trip and the ensuing pain it will inevitably bring. But guess what?  It is always worth the extra effort because our home, bed and recliner will be there when we return.

The U.S. Pain Foundation and their program called “Pain Connection”, hosted this two day workshop in Connecticut, not far from the U.S. Pain Foundation home office.  As with everything else that I’ve ever done with or for them, I was never alone. They walked with me through each and every step of the trip and the workshop. The main thing about any trip is the pre-planning. It makes everything easier if you can call the airlines and arrange for a seat placement that gives you the most amount of comfort.  You can do everything from your bed/recliner and home. All you need is your computer or a telephone. I got an employee of the airport to assist us to the gate, get me and my wheelchair onto the plane ahead of everyone else and all it took was a phone call. They needed the height and weight of my wheelchair and that was all. Everyone was very kind and cooperative. They let me take my wheelchair all the way to the door of the airplane, they took my chair and then assisted me to my seat.  It was much easier to take only “carry on” luggage.  This way we had nothing to “check in”. I brought my gum, headphones, music and smartphone. Everything went smoothly and all of the persons involved were accommodating.  I even spoke to the staff where I had to be “patted down” because of my pacemaker.  I’m not able to go through the scanner or have the wand put around my body because of my implanted medical devices. I told the staff member that I have a nerve disease and she was very cooperative and kind.  She very gingerly patted me down and I was not in any discomfort. You just have to be prepared, verbal and have a kind attitude yourself.

We arrived at our hotel which was a wonderful accommodation and again everything was great! They even had a coffee machine in the lobby with my favorite and special kinds of coffee. We arrived on Friday evening and my husband went to the pool, while I sat at the pool area and rested from the day’s journey. We had a more comfortable bed than mine at home! I slept a whopping 6 hours and the most I ever get is 3 to 4 hours of sleep at home! I’m not sure if it was actually the nice bed or the fact that I was exhausted? Either way I was rested and ready for the day ahead.  On Saturday we went down to a conference room and to my elation, there were several beds ready for takers; along with nice and comfortable tables and chairs.  I had my wheelchair with me, but I quickly snatched up one of the beds and would have gladly shared if anyone had needed it or asked.  We had introductions and proceeded to be trained to work with people who live with chronic pain and their families in a group setting.

Some of the tools that were taught included: relaxation, the “treatment tree” plan, self-compassion, meditation, self-massage and more.  We learned the Psychosocial stages of chronic pain, the grief process and we had a question and answer period with discussions. We watched a couple of videos and did role playing on Sunday. We laughed and cried with each other and truly got to know our peers.  I formed many new friendships during those two days.  These are persons who literally live what my husband/caregiver and I both go through on a daily basis.  The leaders were so wonderful and they too, laughed and cried along with us.  We learned some techniques of Acupuncture and Acupressure and how to lead successful groups.  One part of the weekend that especially touched my heart was when the caregivers did their presentations.  These were the caregivers to the leaders of this training program.  They spoke about how families are affected by chronic pain. Then we had a group discussion. Again on Sunday we learned even more about things such as: guided imagery, breathing techniques, pacing & respecting limits, how to maximize group member engagement and then we learned about flare-up relapse prevention.

At the end of the two days full of enrichment, learning and building friendships; we all received our certification for “group leader training”. We were called up individually and sat on a chair in the middle of the room. It wasn’t intimidating in the least! It was exhilarating to hear the kind words that were said about each person. They went around the room and everyone said something kind and wonderful to the person sitting in the chair.  Maybe it was something they learned from them during the weekend, or it may have been something about their personality that was especially positive? Either way we laughed and cried again, together as a group and individually, personally.   There were polished stones laid out on a table.  Each stone had a word carved or painted on it.  Some of the various words were:  Courage, Hope, Love, Kindness, Healing, patience and so on. Everyone chose a stone that had a special meaning to them and that is when we sat in the “hot seat” and we were given positive feedback from the weekend.

I always felt comfortable to eat, drink or get up and move.  I even wasn’t embarrassed when I fell asleep for a few moments during the comforting music and guided imagery session.  When does a pain patient get to feel so relaxed and comfortable? It is when we are together with others like ourselves and feel comfortable enough to share, laugh and cry together.  I know that many of us were so happy and felt very accommodated and comfortable during this workshop weekend.  Even though I was “wiped out” from the day on Saturday, my husband and I did something that we had never done before! I called an “Uber” to take us out to dinner with some of the staff and other friends who were there.  We had a fun time of chatter and more laughing and much sharing. We went back to the hotel and crashed after that, but it was worth it.

We arrived home but returned with many tools, more knowledge and several new friends. I now feel that I have the tools and am more confident to start and run a support group near my home in Michigan.  I want to give special gratitude to the U.S. Pain foundation and their program called “Pain Connection”.  I also wish to personally say “thank you” to Paul Gileno, Lori Monarca, Gwenn and Malcolm Herman and Cindy and Marty Steinberg. I encourage anyone to be more empowered and try to do things that you think you cannot do. Lastly, I would like to say that whomever wants to know what the U.S. Pain Foundation is all about, read this article again.  You can visit their website and become and Ambassador and have a more fulfilling life.  There is so much that you can do right from your own home. You can even use tools such as Skype and “Google hangouts” to connect with more people. I encourage you to look for a support group near your home and if there is not one available, think about trying to start one yourself. Helping just one person, reaching one person’s heart is worth its weight in gold.

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A note About Hyperalgesia from Dr. Forrest Tennant MD



I run several support groups for various Chronic Pain illnesses. This was posted in a couple of my groups by Dr. Red Lawhern, PhD. He got a note from Dr. Forrest Tenant; who is a legitimate and well known pain specialist. An M.D., Dr. Tennant is a supporter for the appropriate use of opioids.  Here’s a copy of the note from Dr. Tennant to patients, caregivers and advocates for people with chronic pain:

The following is by Dr Forrest Tennant, MD, who is board certified in both pain medicine and addiction medicine. I have his permission to pass it on to pain patients and their families.

5/30/17

HYPERALGESIA: NO REASON TO STOP OR REDUCE OPIOIDS

By

Forest Tennant M.D., Dr. P.H.

Please circulate to patients and families who need guidance on this subject.

One of the excuses that some health practitioners are using to stop opioids is to claim a patient has hyperalgesia (HA). This is a most dishonest, devious, and dangerous ploy.

First, the definition of hyperalgesia is simply that a stimulus such as hitting your thumb with a hammer is more painful than usual. Second, there is no way to measure or quantify the presence of HA in a chronic pain patient who takes opioids. Practitioners who claim that a chronic pain patient has HA usually do so because they don’t like the dosage that a patient must take to relieve pain or they have a bias against opioids. Some practitioners are actually telling patients that HA is harming them, and that their pain will improve or even go away if they stop opioids!! This dishonesty and deviousness may go further. Once off opioids, the practitioner may recommend that a patient have expensive, invasive or unneeded procedures. Danger may come with abrupt cessation of opioids in a severe chronic pain patient. There may be a combined or dual result of a severe pain flare along with severe opioid withdrawal symptoms. This combined effect may result in a stroke, heart attack, psychosis, or adrenal failure. Some patients may commit suicide.

All who read this need to know that many expert pain specialists either do not believe that HA even exists or that it is irrelevant to clinical practice. In other words, if a certain dosage of opioids is effective, continue treatment with opioids. There is no reason to stop or reduce opioids just based on HA.

Any time a patient is told they have HA and should stop or reduce opioids, they and their family or advocate should ask the following questions of the prescribing practitioner:

1. What test or evaluation did you do to determine that I have HA?

2. If I do have HA, what damage is it doing? (Show me some studies!!)

3. When did I get HA? (Nothing has change in some time!)

4. I’ve heard that HA may be the result of too much neuroinflammation or hormone deficiencies? Don’t I need to be tested for these?

5. If I stop or reduce opioids and still have some pain, what are my alternatives? (Will you return me to my original opioid dosage?)

The author’s personal recommendations are: (1) If your opioids don’t seem to be as effective as they once were, get a hormone panel blood test. I’ve seen many patients boost their opioid effect by replenishing pregnenolone, testosterone, estradiol, or another hormone that has diminished.; (2) If you wish to reduce or stop your opioids, reduce your dosage about 5% a month. By slowly tapering you may be able to greatly reduce or even stop opioids.

Please inform all parties that HA is not, per se, a reason to stop or reduce opioids. More important, if you reduce or stop opioids, what is your alternative, and, if the alternative doesn’t work, what will you do?

Chronic Pain In A Culture of Intolerance


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Being a Health advocate/activist” for people like myself, who live with chronic pain; is becoming more of a challenge.  I’m feeling both proactive and protective.  I want to help change the way society and the government thinks about chronic pain and the persons living with the daily struggles from it. I also want to help put a more positive spin on something that is very difficult to stay positive about.  While Governor Chris Christie is becoming the “drug Czar”; he is talking about changing  many lives in a negative way.  Our President is putting persons in charge of what he has only heard of as “the Opioid Epidemic”.  He listens to what others tell him and he reads about statistics or numbers of deaths; not the number of “people who have died”.   Those are people who have passed away not numbers on a screen. These people each have or had their own story to tell and nobody was listening.  I’m trying to get someone to listen to us.   As a chronic pain patient myself, I can say that we feel like the rules of the “game” are being changed, without talking to any of the real players.  When you only are only told one side of a story over and over again; you are not going to get the whole truth or the entire story.  When the President or the Governor talks with people who have lost someone that they love due to a “drug overdose”; then that is the way the story is going to spin.  There are journalists who have lost someone they love, to a drug overdose and they are writing over and over again about the “horrors of the Opioid epidemic”. There are reporters who are speaking against Opioids on the Television and producers making short films about “The Oxycontin Express”.  I can only say that if I was misinformed and heartbroken, that I might do the same thing. But I’m not misinformed and I honestly feel that if I lost someone to an overdose, I would still try not to hurt anyone else while I was in mourning. I wouldn’t try to “punish the whole class for the behavior of one”. I would not want to go on a mission to try and “save everyone else” (while hurting so many and possibly not even knowing) to make myself feel better.

I turned on the TV the other night and one of the news stations had a week long special about “the Opioid Epidemic”. I was yelling at the screen and telling them that they hadn’t a clue! The person they had on as a guest, was someone who had broken his leg, had surgery and had become an Opioid addict! That is not the same thing as someone living with daily chronic pain and knowing that  life will always be this way.  Persons like me who live with chronic pain day in and day out, do need to try physical therapy, and other first choice treatments available.  We realize that we need to give different options a chance.  But when a patient with several high pain illnesses has tried many alternatives; and is not a candidate for other options;  then they/we need reassurance.  We need to know that the medications that many of us have taken for several years and that give some semblance of a life; are going to remain available and nobody will rip the rug out from under us!

I am in a group of people called “chronic pain patients”. We are not drug addicts! The definition of an addict, according to the Dictionary (on Definitions.com) is this:  “to devote or surrender oneself to something habitually or obsessively”.  I can speak for myself and the hundreds of chronic pain support group members that I mentor.  We  take only the medications prescribed to us by our physicians and/or Pain Management Physicians.  To clarify, I will explain further the difference between the addict and the pain patient.  The majority of chronic pain patients take their prescription pain medications (or Opioids) responsibly.  The medications for pain are taken per the instructions of a legitimate pain management physician or well known doctor.  Long time pain patients continue on a steady dose of pain medications and do not crave more than that. In fact, the truth is that just about all chronic pain patients, myself included, don’t want to be on the medications that we are taking.  On the other hand, an addict has thoughts about their medications/drugs constantly and overwhelmingly.  They can’t function because they’re thinking about their next dose all day long.

I read an article awhile back called “The Word is Credibility-Not Stigma-in the Prescription Opioid/Heroin Epidemic”; that really hit a nerve with me.  It upset me because the writer puts down the responsible chronic pain patients and “lumps” us together in the same category as heroin addicts.  She wrote about the deaths of people who have overdosed.  But how many of those deaths were people who took only their prescribed dosage of pain medications?  I read another article in which the writer (*Denise Molohon, a guest columnist for PNN January-2016)) stated that “the CDC even admits to giving out skewed data”.  The CDC has qualifiers for their “Morbidity and Mortality weekly report.  She researched the information that she was given and found that those qualifiers are as follows:

  • “approximately 1/5 of drug overdose deaths lack information on the specific drugs involved. Some of these deaths might involve opioids.”
  • “Heroin deaths might be misclassified as morphine because morphine and heroin are metabolized similarly, which might result in an underreporting of heroin overdose deaths”

The writer also stated that “if heroin deaths are being misclassified as morphine, which results in the “underreporting” of heroin overdose deaths, then wouldn’t the opposite also be true? That there is “over-reporting” of morphine deaths, which are then misclassified as prescription Opioid deaths?”  Also, when we are reading or hearing reports about fentanyl overdose deaths; most of those deaths are from street drugs fentanyl and not the prescription pain medication.  We just can’t lump medications and street drugs together, that is irresponsible.  Only “5% of people who are prescribed Opioid pain medications, go on to become addicted”,  according to our own National Pain Report in November 2015.  As a legitimate chronic pain patient, I can verify that we only take pain medications to be relieved of horrible daily chronic pain, nerve pain and the pain from such illnesses as CRPS plus many others.  We don’t become “addicted” to our prescription pain medications.  Our bodies may become tolerant or “dependent”, but  we are not addicts.

There are support systems such as the U.S. Pain Foundation and RSDSA who encourage the chronic pain patients to not be hopeless.  They empower us and encourage us to do whatever we can do but never more than that.  We have a voice and it needs to be heard.  Anyone who hasn’t experienced chronic pain first hand or even as a caregiver, hasn’t any idea what it’s like to be in horrible pain 24/7/365.  When you are finally given something to alleviate that pain somewhat (but never 100%), it is a relief.  But then because of the people or groups who are working very hard to take our pain medications away, we become fearful each month that goes by.  We fear that one method that helps us to get out of bed each morning without writhing in pain, crying and screaming out in horrible nerve pain; could be taken away at any moment.

I feel that people who are doing this are doing it for the wrong reasons.  People need to be educated regarding Opioids instead of being afraid of them.  There are some chronic pain patients who are not candidates for other types of pain control, such as the pain pump or the spinal cord stimulater (SCS).  Taking a medication away that helps so many pain patients to just put their feet on the ground in the morning, seems cruel.  Hurting someone because you have felt “wronged”, is just terrible. There needs to be some kind of shelter from the world of intolerance.

 

 

 

 

 

Illness Doesn’t Equal Lack of Faith


 

I have heard  that my tragedies, illnesses, abuse etc. are cast upon me because maybe I am not virtuous enough?  I’ve even heard that maybe I am cursed because I do not have enough faith?  A friend of mine had someone in a local market say that they were going to “cast away the devil in her” because she carries a cane. I have had people say that they want to “lay hands upon me and pray upon me, because I am afflicted”, they feel that their prayers will “cast out evil spirits, or evilness that has caused my afflictions”.  There was  another who  told me that I don’t “have enough God in my life” and therefore I have “so many tragedies” and it is because I “have not forgiven my abusers in this life”…..Sometimes I feel that over zealous, “fundamentalists”, who are excited about God’s miracles, try to “play God” in peoples lives. For instance, I heard about an 18 year old girl who went to a Christian camp and was told that her younger brother need not have died from Cancer, if only the family had more faith! WHAT?  You NEVER know who is going to be stricken with an affliction, an illness, disease or grief.  Put yourself in their shoes and think about what you say.  I am a “Chemo Angel”.  I get assigned a person who’s going through chemo therapy and I send them small gifts & cards of cheer. Right now I have a small, 3 year old girl, with “Langerhans cell Histiocytosis (LCH) “, a form of childhood cancer. Could anyone say that she is ill because she doesn’t have enough Faith or that she’s done something to wrong God and he is “disappointed” in her? Can you say that she has had cancer for 3 out of her 4 years of life, because her family doesn’t have enough faith? NO, that would be cruel and judgemental!

First of all, none of the statements about “illness being due to a lack of Faith”, are accurate. Look at Job and all that he went through!  Job was persecuted because of his faith in God.  Job was given an “affliction”, not because he was “cursed” and certainly not by his own fault.  Three of Job’s friends came to comfort him at the beginning of his worst pain and loss! They were sure that Job was sick and suffering because of the sins he had committed during his life. They told him that “righteous people don’t suffer”. Job always continued to say that he had done nothing sinful or wrong.  In the Bible it does not say that a lack of healing is equal to a lack of faith! God can choose not to heal the faithful, but it is not connected to a lack of faith.

It is cruel, unloving, unkind and just wrong, to say that someone has a lack of faith and is ill, or stricken with loss and tragedy in life because they don’t have enough prayer, faith or enough love of Jesus Christ.  To accost anyone in such a judgemental way does not help but only makes them feel marginalized and more alone.  There are many different faiths in our society. Each Religion has its own set of beliefs, rules and rituals. I’m not here to judge any of these Faiths or  beliefs, but I am here to say that nobody is sick because of their belief system or lack of faith.  People don’t live with chronic pain day in and day out due to any Religious affiliations or lack thereof. We don’t use a cane, a wheelchair or a walker because we do not pray enough.  It does not help a person with chronic pain and illness, to approach them and say any of the words that I’ve stated above. If you choose to pray for someone, then you can do that. But don’t try to push guilt and more pain onto anyone who’s already suffering. That doesn’t help, it only hurts and makes things much worse. Please try to remember to treat others as you would wish to be treated.

With Gratitude From A Pain Ambassador


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Hello Luvs,

I have an exciting story to tell you. So here we go:

As I sat in my “Lazy Boy”chair with a pillow under my knees and a soft blanket over my body, I flipped through my smartphone. I was checking my email on a cold Winter’s night and suddenly I was filled with a feeling of friendship and a special kind of love and appreciation. I received an email stating that I was “nominated by a group of my peers, for the U.S. Pain Foundation’s 2016, Joselynn Badman, Pain Ambassador of the Year Award”! I was surprised, happy and filled with a feeling of being appreciated. No matter if I win or not, I thought; how nice was it to be nominated by my peers.

I don’t participate in competitions or contests where I have to ask people to vote for me. I had at one time done that, in the beginning; several years ago.  But it didn’t give me a good feeling inside. It felt like a popularity contest. It felt as though others might think that I was doing good things in order to get something.  This was a nomination that i had known nothing about and didn’t ask anyone for anything. It was awesome to be nominated.

I filled out the questionnaire that I received from the U.S. Pain Foundation and waited for the results to be announced in the New Year of 2017. Then one day in January, I opened up an email message from my dear friend, Ellen Lennox-Smith; in which she was congratulating me on “winning the Joselynn Badman Ambassador of the Year Award” for 2016.  I had no idea and I got so excited that I think I would have jumped up and down if I could have! My husband was sitting next to me and I told him about it. He was so happy and then we furiously looked to find out more information. I hadn’t read my earlier email yet and there inside of an email from earlier in the day, was the U.S. Pain Foundation’s Monthly Newsletter. I opened it up and the first item on it, was a photo of me holding my “special tribute” from the Governor and a House Rep. in Michigan. Then I saw the words, “2016 Ambassador of the Year:  Suzanne Stewart”.  I looked to my earlier emails for that day, and there was a beautiful note from Lori Monarca, the Executive Office Director of U.S.Pain Foundation.  It reads ” Congratulations to  you Suzanne on your nomination and honor for the Ambassador of the Year Award!!  What a great honor to have you win this as you have put so much time and hard efforts in such an amazing way throughout the community during the year!  Your determination and dedication is unbelievable and you are so worthy of this award. Thank you so very much for being a part of our U.S. Pain Family!” I proceeded to get beautiful and loving notes, one after another from these persons who I call my U.S. Pain “family”.

I later got emails from Lori and from Paul Gileno, the President of the U.S. Pain Foundation.  Paul congratulated me and told me that he was going to fly all the way from his home in CT. to my home in Michigan, to give me my Award in person!  I was so thrilled and couldn’t and cannot even believe the love and kindness shown to me by this pain family.  This is the U.S. Pain Foundation, my “family” that is made up of many other persons who also live with pain issues.  They strive to advocate and try to always help others. A family of pain patients helping other pain patients.

If you know anything about my life, you will know that things had never been easy growing up. Life just kept getting harder and more painful. Bad things kept happening to me, one after another.  I’ve never won anything and I never even thought about it.  Mostly because I’d always thought that “those kinds of things happen to other people”.  I’ve continued onward to be the best person that I can be. I try to think of others and treat people how I wish to be treated. I’ve made my fair share of mistakes and I’ve had days when I didn’t behave or speak in a manner that I would prefer. But I get up each day and keep trying to move forward in a positive manner; to the best of my ability.

As time went on, there were emails exchanged and plans were made for Paul to come to my home and present me with the Award. I was so excited and then nervous to make sure that I made a good impression, of course. But then again, I’m not sure why I was nervous? I had spent several days “hanging out” with Paul and everyone from U.S. Pain, last Summer at the Pain Summit!  We ate lobster together and even wore those little bibs ..LOL.!  The day arrived and it was Thursday, February 2, 2017.  I think that I changed my outfit about ten times that day.  I didn’t want to be too dressed up or not dressed up enough. I wanted to be dressed appropriately but what is appropriate, to wear for receiving an award?  We were going to go out for dinner and my family and friends were invited. It was all very exciting and I think I emailed Lori more than a few times within that 24 hour period, asking many questions. I even asked if I should wear my U.S. Pain Foundation, collared shirt, with their Logo on it. She was so kind and told me to just be comfortable.

I had nothing to fear, because once I opened up the door and saw Paul standing there; all of my nervousness disappeared. I only felt calm, happy, excited and appreciated. He is one of the most kind men I’ve met in my lifetime.  He came into our home and my husband and I chatted, laughed and joked with him for quite awhile. I felt very comfortable  and then he gave me the most beautiful crystal award. I’ve never seen anything so beautiful and with such wonderful, kind words engraved on it, too. It says, “U.S. Pain Foundation” (and their Logo)…then it says: “AMBASSADOR OF THE YEAR 2016–presented to SUZANNE STEWART, In Recognition for your Outstanding & Dedicated Services to the Pain Community”….I was in awe, my jaw dropped and my heart was beating quite fast. I feel so honored and humbled to receive such a beautiful award with words on it that are so meaningful.

I am quite humbled by this Award and by the entire experience.  I’ve never expected anything for what I do. I love people and helping persons with chronic pain illnesses, like myself. I simply do what I do because it honestly helps me to stay positive and gives me more of a “purpose”. Keeping other pain patients hopeful, positive and sharing information with them via my writing and support groups etc.; makes me feel happier. Like I always say “HOPE is a Verb. You must DO something in order to keep hopeful and positive”.  Helping  the U.S. Pain Foundation by holding Awareness events, being an Advocate and fundraising is another way that I get to help others living with Chronic Pain. It’s just in my blood because before I was disabled by chronic pain, I was an Interpreter for the Deaf. I worked with Deaf children doing speech, auditory training and taught American Sign Language. These days aside from being a chronic pain patient, ironically I have two hearing aids. I have hearing and vision issues since a car accident in 2002 left me with many health issues, several chronic pain illnesses and a Traumatic Brain Injury. But I’m always happiest when doing something for others.

A group of my peers anonymously nominated me for this award and the U.S. Pain Foundation gave it to me. To my peers,  I say “Thank you so much for the nomination. I have made some wonderful lifelong friendships by being an Ambassador for the U.S. Pain Foundation.  I’d like to reiterate that I feel humbled and so honored to have been nominated for and to receive this special award.  But U.S. Pain Foundation are the ones who deserve something wonderful for all that they do for persons living with daily chronic pain. They go “to bat” for all of us when they visit the state and federal legislators. They not only fight for our rights but they teach us how to fight for ourselves. There are:  conferences, webinars, Twitter chats, Social media days for sending out love and Information regarding rare diseases, Invisible illnesses and more!  They hold the annual Pain Summit to educate us more about ways to help ourselves. One of the main things U.S. Pain likes to teach us is to “take care of ourselves first”.  I really want to reiterate my gratitude for Paul coming all the way to our home in Michigan, to give my award in person and in front of my family and best friends. With that gratitude I also want to add the wonderful dinner and conversations that we shared. A chronic pain patient himself, Paul Gileno, flew several hundred miles to personally give me a beautiful, meaningful experience along with a lovely award. Again, I say “Thank You  very much from the bottom of my heart. I only hope that I can follow Joselynn Badman’s example of a true Pain Ambassador and Pain Warrior. I will continue to learn, advocate, share awareness and speak about HOPE for persons living with chronic pain”.