About suboxone, buprenorphine and naloxone


The current Opioid Hysteria was started several years ago with a rippling effect and has become worse over time. A company that has much to gain from this hysteria around opioids is called Reckitt Benckiser. According to this article in “The Daily Beast” from 10-05-16 : https://www.thedailybeast.com/suboxone-creators-shocking-scheme-to-profit-off-of-heroin-addicts , the company was about to lose their patent and came up with a “fake opioid hysteria”.  According to this article, “Reckitt Benckiser sought to exploit the nationwide hysteria over the increasing use of opioids to line its own pockets by blocking competition….”.

The drug Suboxone has a Generic name of buprenorphine and naloxone (oral/sublingual). If you visit https://www.drugs.com/suboxone.html you will notice that Bupenorphine is  also considered an “opioid medication, sometimes called a narcotic”.  Naloxone “blocks the effects of opioid medications”. Naloxone also blocks any pain relief or feelings of well-being, according to this article. The drug, “Suboxone is used to treat narcotic (opiate) addiction”. Suboxone is not to be used for any kind of pain relief or as a pain relieving medication. What I don’t understand are the warnings on Suboxone and these medications associated with it in generic form. The same warning is used on the label as is used for many opioids. The warnings state that if you used Suboxone, Bupenorphrine  and/or Naloxone it may be “habit-forming” and can cause addiction, overdose or even death. The company Reckitt Benckiser is trying to get rid of all other opioids so that they can profit off of having a monopoly on their own medications. They claim that all chronic pain patients are suffering from “opioid use disorder” or addiction, in other items that I have read.  Other warnings on the labels of these 3 drugs, state that  some other medications, if taken simultaneously with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine and/or Naloxone, can cause a serious medical crisis called “Serotonin syndrome”. They state that you should be warned and inform your Dr. If you take any herbal supplements, depression medications (*or if. You have any mental illness), Parkinson’s disease, migraines, serious infections or any medication that helps stop nausea/vomiting. The label states that these medications can cause “life threatening withdrawal symptoms”. Some of the side effects are: weak/shallow breathing, confusion, weakness, blurred vision, slurred speech, liver problems, low cortisol levels (nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite etc).  One of the most interesting side effects listed are “opioid withdrawal symptoms” (shivering, increased sweating, runny nose, watery eyes, muscle pain and diarrhea). Tell me again, why this medicine is “better” for chronic pain patients to take than long acting or really any opioids? How are these side effects and warnings any better? Also, as long as a chronic pain patient has been doing well on long term opioid therapy, why switch to something that could be potentially harmful or cause them death? Also, women or men who are still thinking about having or starting a family, do you know that Suboxone can cause infertility (*this article states that long term opioid use can also cause infertility?).  Many other medications will affect Suboxone, such as Benzodiazephines, other narcotic medications & cough medicine. It states that Suboxone is used to treat drug/opioid addiction. It does not say that it is for chronic pain in any way, shape or form.

Don’t let anyone tell you that buprenorphine is “different from suboxone” because from my research it is just a generic form of that drug. It is an opioid but has not yet been approved for use with chronic pain. Dr’s are required to take an 8 hour class in order to prescribe these drugs to patients. They are supposed to be prescribed for addiction and/or substance use disorder. The latter is what our friend, Andrew Kolodny has labeled all chronic pain patients who use opioid therapy, as having. When I looked up the classes online, that physicians, nurse practitioners etc. are required to take in order to prescribe the drug “buprenorphine”; it states this is a  medication for addiction and opioid use disorder. Physicians must apply for a waiver to prescribe bupreorpnine to their patients with opioid use disorders.

I noticed an article last week that was discussing suboxone, that it is only approved for addiction. The active ingredient in this drug is Called buprenorphine, which is known as an “opioid partial agonist”. This just means that it interacts with the same receptors in the brain, as heroin and oxycodone. The difference they explain, is that people don’t get a “high” or “cravings” for buprenorphine. But then why can’t chronic pain patients who have been doing well on opioid therapy for several or many years be left to the opioid medications that they may have been doing well on for many years? Patients who have been on a steady dose of opioids for possibly multiple chronic pain conditions, do not get cravings or high either? Why introduce these chronically ill people to something new, something else that will cause them new and or worse bad reactions/side effects?  I found in this article (www.crchealth.com/addiction/heroin-addiction-treatment/heroin-detox/buprenorphine-suboxone-vs/) that suboxone  contains buprenorphrine and naloxone. The naloxone keeps people from abusing the drug. It is an opiate antagonist. But why would anyone give these meds to chronic pain patients who do not use the opioids for any other reason than to have some semblance of a life with lesser pain levels? It states right in this last article above, that “If you take suboxone as directed…..the buprenorphrine will travel to the brain and you will feel relief from withdrawal symptoms. Chronic pain patients should not have to go through withdrawal symptoms. This is what I’m trying to get through to persons who are “pushing” these drugs on the chronic pain population now.

In this article called “The truth about suboxone” (www.thefix.com/content/stigma-maintenance-treatment9216), Maia Szalavitz discusses maintenance therapy for addiction with suboxone, Methadone or Naltrexone. She explains something that I’ve known to be true about opioids as well. If they are taken in irregular time and dosage then you will get a high. But if you take them in a regular reliable schedule and dosage, then “getting high is visually impossible”. Next, I read an article about different people who had been given the “bupenorphrine isn’t suboxone” speech. They were told that it would help them with withdrawals etc. But guess what? The person who told his story first, in this article, stated that withdrawals from the buprenorphrine were much worse than anything he had expected, encountered or had been told. I read his story here: (https://www.medhelp.org/posts/Addiction-Substance-Abuse/Suboxone-Good–Bad–and-Ugly-Truth—168-days-off-SUB/show/1502381) . I have been researching these drugs.  In my humble opinion as a non-medical personnel, who has been through hell and back; trying different pain treatments and medications over the past 15 years; that I would not ever take suboxone, or buprenorphrine even if my life depended on it! I finally found something that worked to lessen the chronic pain due to several chronic pain illnesses; I agreed to take it after being pressured “to trust them”(doctors). But now only to have it taken away 15 years later because of some crazy opioid hysteria going on so that “he who shall not be named” can become more rich and have a monopoly on suboxone, bupenorphrine etc. by “getting rid of all opioids”.

We live in America and we should be free to have choices as to what medications we want to take, knowing the risks and benefits. Just as we have freedom of speech, freedom to bear arms and now even freedom to have gender neutral restrooms! We deserve the right to have freedom to choose with our own personal physicians who are trained in pain management etc; the right to take the best medications for our own personal situations. The government needs to step away and stop trying to politicize this opioid hysteria. Stop trying to demonize the organizations that support our freedoms of treatment options! This has turned into a deadly nightmare for many of us and now myself included.

***P.S.

I also want to inform you that each time I tried to look up or research “buprenorphrine” it came up as “suboxone”. Buprenorphrine is a generic form of suboxone. In addition, naloxone is the ingredient that immediately makes you go through withdrawals if you do take another opioid/narcotic while taking suboxone. Hmmm….suppose you were in a car accident, maybe like the one that started all of your chronic pain in the first place? Suppose the EMT’s or an ER Doctor gave you an opioid to help with burn trauma or gunshot trauma wounds or horrible car accident trauma? You would be really “in trouble” would you not? Anyways, just another informative message from me to you. I hope this helps someone. Sending Love and low pain your way.

*************************************

This is where I got some of this information:

1. https://www..com/suboxone-creators-shocking-scheme-to-profit-off-of-heroin-addicts

2. https://www.drugs.com/suboxone.html

Articles that Explain The Bad effects of suboxone, bupenorphrine etc.

1.  Why Suboxone Treatment Can Be Harmful

2. The Suboxone Conspiracy

3. the ugly truth about suboxone withdrawals

*****Several of the articles used in this blog post were provided to me by my colleague & friend, Jonelle Elgaway *** please visit her website at: CAW Nation

Chronic Pain In A Culture of Intolerance


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Being a Health advocate/activist” for people like myself, who live with chronic pain; is becoming more of a challenge.  I’m feeling both proactive and protective.  I want to help change the way society and the government thinks about chronic pain and the persons living with the daily struggles from it. I also want to help put a more positive spin on something that is very difficult to stay positive about.  While Governor Chris Christie is becoming the “drug Czar”; he is talking about changing  many lives in a negative way.  Our President is putting persons in charge of what he has only heard of as “the Opioid Epidemic”.  He listens to what others tell him and he reads about statistics or numbers of deaths; not the number of “people who have died”.   Those are people who have passed away not numbers on a screen. These people each have or had their own story to tell and nobody was listening.  I’m trying to get someone to listen to us.   As a chronic pain patient myself, I can say that we feel like the rules of the “game” are being changed, without talking to any of the real players.  When you only are only told one side of a story over and over again; you are not going to get the whole truth or the entire story.  When the President or the Governor talks with people who have lost someone that they love due to a “drug overdose”; then that is the way the story is going to spin.  There are journalists who have lost someone they love, to a drug overdose and they are writing over and over again about the “horrors of the Opioid epidemic”. There are reporters who are speaking against Opioids on the Television and producers making short films about “The Oxycontin Express”.  I can only say that if I was misinformed and heartbroken, that I might do the same thing. But I’m not misinformed and I honestly feel that if I lost someone to an overdose, I would still try not to hurt anyone else while I was in mourning. I wouldn’t try to “punish the whole class for the behavior of one”. I would not want to go on a mission to try and “save everyone else” (while hurting so many and possibly not even knowing) to make myself feel better.

I turned on the TV the other night and one of the news stations had a week long special about “the Opioid Epidemic”. I was yelling at the screen and telling them that they hadn’t a clue! The person they had on as a guest, was someone who had broken his leg, had surgery and had become an Opioid addict! That is not the same thing as someone living with daily chronic pain and knowing that  life will always be this way.  Persons like me who live with chronic pain day in and day out, do need to try physical therapy, and other first choice treatments available.  We realize that we need to give different options a chance.  But when a patient with several high pain illnesses has tried many alternatives; and is not a candidate for other options;  then they/we need reassurance.  We need to know that the medications that many of us have taken for several years and that give some semblance of a life; are going to remain available and nobody will rip the rug out from under us!

I am in a group of people called “chronic pain patients”. We are not drug addicts! The definition of an addict, according to the Dictionary (on Definitions.com) is this:  “to devote or surrender oneself to something habitually or obsessively”.  I can speak for myself and the hundreds of chronic pain support group members that I mentor.  We  take only the medications prescribed to us by our physicians and/or Pain Management Physicians.  To clarify, I will explain further the difference between the addict and the pain patient.  The majority of chronic pain patients take their prescription pain medications (or Opioids) responsibly.  The medications for pain are taken per the instructions of a legitimate pain management physician or well known doctor.  Long time pain patients continue on a steady dose of pain medications and do not crave more than that. In fact, the truth is that just about all chronic pain patients, myself included, don’t want to be on the medications that we are taking.  On the other hand, an addict has thoughts about their medications/drugs constantly and overwhelmingly.  They can’t function because they’re thinking about their next dose all day long.

I read an article awhile back called “The Word is Credibility-Not Stigma-in the Prescription Opioid/Heroin Epidemic”; that really hit a nerve with me.  It upset me because the writer puts down the responsible chronic pain patients and “lumps” us together in the same category as heroin addicts.  She wrote about the deaths of people who have overdosed.  But how many of those deaths were people who took only their prescribed dosage of pain medications?  I read another article in which the writer (*Denise Molohon, a guest columnist for PNN January-2016)) stated that “the CDC even admits to giving out skewed data”.  The CDC has qualifiers for their “Morbidity and Mortality weekly report.  She researched the information that she was given and found that those qualifiers are as follows:

  • “approximately 1/5 of drug overdose deaths lack information on the specific drugs involved. Some of these deaths might involve opioids.”
  • “Heroin deaths might be misclassified as morphine because morphine and heroin are metabolized similarly, which might result in an underreporting of heroin overdose deaths”

The writer also stated that “if heroin deaths are being misclassified as morphine, which results in the “underreporting” of heroin overdose deaths, then wouldn’t the opposite also be true? That there is “over-reporting” of morphine deaths, which are then misclassified as prescription Opioid deaths?”  Also, when we are reading or hearing reports about fentanyl overdose deaths; most of those deaths are from street drugs fentanyl and not the prescription pain medication.  We just can’t lump medications and street drugs together, that is irresponsible.  Only “5% of people who are prescribed Opioid pain medications, go on to become addicted”,  according to our own National Pain Report in November 2015.  As a legitimate chronic pain patient, I can verify that we only take pain medications to be relieved of horrible daily chronic pain, nerve pain and the pain from such illnesses as CRPS plus many others.  We don’t become “addicted” to our prescription pain medications.  Our bodies may become tolerant or “dependent”, but  we are not addicts.

There are support systems such as the U.S. Pain Foundation and RSDSA who encourage the chronic pain patients to not be hopeless.  They empower us and encourage us to do whatever we can do but never more than that.  We have a voice and it needs to be heard.  Anyone who hasn’t experienced chronic pain first hand or even as a caregiver, hasn’t any idea what it’s like to be in horrible pain 24/7/365.  When you are finally given something to alleviate that pain somewhat (but never 100%), it is a relief.  But then because of the people or groups who are working very hard to take our pain medications away, we become fearful each month that goes by.  We fear that one method that helps us to get out of bed each morning without writhing in pain, crying and screaming out in horrible nerve pain; could be taken away at any moment.

I feel that people who are doing this are doing it for the wrong reasons.  People need to be educated regarding Opioids instead of being afraid of them.  There are some chronic pain patients who are not candidates for other types of pain control, such as the pain pump or the spinal cord stimulater (SCS).  Taking a medication away that helps so many pain patients to just put their feet on the ground in the morning, seems cruel.  Hurting someone because you have felt “wronged”, is just terrible. There needs to be some kind of shelter from the world of intolerance.

 

 

 

 

 

Opioids Kill Pain, Not People


Hello Luvs,

This writing turned into an article for the Health News Magazine that I author for, and have since November 2016! I love it and am enjoying this so much! I wanted to make sure to send you the link to the edited version of my blog post, which is the article of the same name. It is here: http://NationalPainReport.com/Opioids-kill-pain-not-people-8833207.html ….

I wanted to write something to enlighten the non-pain community as well as those who are in pain but are either new to the pain or have not had much of a relationship or experience with Opioids. Opioids can cause “dependence” just the same as many anti-depressants, blood pressure meds and Beta blockers.  Dependence is not the same as addiction and I will try to explain that in this writing. People who take opioids for chronic pain illnesses that carry a # of 43 on the McGill pain scale, for example:  CRPS or Complex Regional pain syndrome (and many others); do not get a “HIGH” from taking them.  When you have very extreme chronic daily pain, the Opioids just relieve the pain and do not give a Euphoric feeling whatsoever.  Of course, I am writing from my own experience and from the experience of being a patient health advocate since 2007 and a patient leader, as well as an administrator for several chronic pain illness groups.

Opioids do not kill people, but they do kill the pain for awhile. If you ask a person with chronic pain, if they enjoy taking these medications; they will all tell you “NO”! We do not like that we need or depend on these meds for relieving our daily high pain. We wish that we did not need the Opioids and we would prefer to just live pain free.  Many people that do not experience daily chronic pain, have the notion that Opioids are killing people.  This may be partially true, but not so, for the true chronic pain patients and the pain community. Those who die from taking Opioids are usually mixing it with other things from the “streets”.  They mix it with Heroin or crack cocaine or other “street” drugs; sometimes alcohol too.  Others, for example, celebrities who have passed away from taking Opioids, have mixed it with other substances. The news shows us that “another celebrity has died from an Opioid overdose”.  That’s not the whole truth, because that person had other substances in their bodies, we would later find out; after getting the coroner’s report.

In my research, I found an article on the website for RSDHOPE.org and it says this: In an article written by WebMD in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic states, “Some medications used to treat pain can be addictive.Addiction is different from physical dependence or tolerance, however. In cases of physical dependence, withdrawal symptoms occur when a substance suddenly is stopped. Tolerance occurs when the initial dose of a substance loses its effectiveness over time. Addiction and physical dependence often occur together.” People who take a class of drugs called opioids for a long period of time may develop tolerance and even physical dependence. This does not mean, however, that a person is addicted. In general, the chance of addiction is very small when narcotics are used under proper medical supervision.” The article goes on to say, “Most people who take their pain medicine as directed by their doctor do not become addicted, even if they take the medicine for a long time.” You can read the original article in its’ entirety. (this was found on the RSDHOPE.org Website here: @http://www.rsdhope.org/addiction-dependence-or-tolerance-to-opiods.html). In that same article at RSDHOPE.org, they go on to explain that: “Another article, written by Leanna Skarnulis, states, “Chronic pain patients often confuse tolerance with addiction. They become fearful when the dosage of a narcotic has to be increased, but it’s normal for the body to build up tolerance over time, says Simmonds, spokeswoman for the American Cancer Society. “Patients don’t get a high, and they don’t get addicted.

I was researching for this article and I read about Elvis Presley, Prince, Michael Jackson and others who died from what was called  or labeled “Opioid overdose”.  But if you read more and dig deeper, you will find that the larger percentage of these people and others, die because they have mixed a prescription Opioid with other medications, drugs, street drugs and/or alcohol. I’m not saying that nobody died from taking Opioids in an overdose.  I will defend my cause by stating that the every single person that I’ve come across within my own pain community (*which is a large number of people because of my being a patient health advocate, Ambassador for US Pain Foundation, mentor for newly diagnosed CRPS patients and a patient leader for WEGO Health and founder/admin. for 4 different kinds of chronic pain support groups) has told me that they do not take more than what is prescribed, therefore they are not “addicted”.  I will also state from my own experience, that people living with daily high pain illnesses, do not “crave” their pain medication. I have never craved my medicines, nor do I seek them out or think about them every day or continuously.

The chronic pain community has been talking about the Opioids more lately and we have been afraid and worried.  This is happening because there are “people” with power who are trying to take away our small semblance of a “normal” life with lowered amounts of pain. I understand that there are parents who’ve lost children and Children who’ve lost parents due to drug overdoses. I realize that people who are uninformed or misinformed regarding chronic pain; think they are taking on a cause or “helping”others because of their loss. I feel deeply sad for anyone who’s lost someone that they love from a drug overdose or for any reason, for that matter.  It’s a bit similar to what used to happen when we were children in a classroom at school.  The teachers would punish the entire class for something that one child did and he would not confess to doing it.  The entire pain community should not be punished because of the actions of some.

There are some other reasons for The Opioid Debacle that’s happening right now around us.  There are those “persons” who make money off of our chronic pain and suffering.  People who make a fortune doing invasive and dangerous surgeries on the pain community.  Also the many different therapies and treatment modalities that insurance doesn’t cover, for the most part. There are PROP physicians and others who say that Opioids don’t help chronic pain! The latter is an untrue statement because I’m here today as a chronic pain patient who does NOT and has not gone up in dosage in many years. I have experience being with many persons in the chronic pain community who will testify that taking a routine and regular dosage of Opioids, does help relieve their chronic pain.  We are not addicted, we do not seek out or crave the Opioids and we deserve to be able to just “take a pill” that has little or no side effects, for many.

Lastly, I would like to say that there are advocates in physicians and others who truly want to help those with chronic pain.  One of our biggest advocates, is a physician named, Dr. Lynn Webster (www.LynnWbsterMD.com). He is someone who has been trying to help our community. Dr. L. Webster, M.D., has a book out called “The Painful Truth” (www.thepainfultruthbook.com) and now there is a movie  with the same name on PBS also. For anyone who is interested in learning more about chronic pain and how medications like Opioids can help; here is the link to the PBS broadcasting :  The Painful Truth .

**HEY, Please follow me on TWITTTER at these two Handles: @RASEforCRPS and @ Ppl_InPainUnite …(RASE stands for “Research,Awareness,Support and Educate)

The Opioid Debacle


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Hello Luvs,

Many chronic pain patients, like myself, have legitimate concerns that we didn’t have to deal with a few years ago. Just prior to this Opioid debacle that has occurred in these past few years, we had enough to worry about due to our pain issues.  We worry about finding good and trustworthy physicians, pharmacies that have our best interest in mind, tests that we endure and then pay for; among other things. We have to find a way to arrive at our appointments, possibly find someone to go with us and find Dr.’s willing to help relieve our pain. We just need someone to listen to our ideas, concerns and take our feelings into consideration at the same time. These days we have so much more on our plates and it is adding worry, pain and an increase in suicide to the list.

There are rumors flying on Twitter, Facebook and in the news media, that we have an “Opioid epidemic” in our midst.  Lawmakers and those who don’t have a clue what daily life is like for the chronic pain patient; have just blindly accepted this hype.  I totally agree that deaths from overdose of Heroin and other “street drugs” are happening. It is real and people are dying. I do know that the true “drug addicts” are mixing and/or changing some very helpful pain medications, with illegal substances and making more dangerous drugs that kill.  But taking the small amount of relief away from pain patients is not going to fix the problem. The CDC, FDA, lawmakers and  the Physicians who “don’t have a clue about chronic pain from a personal standpoint”; are taking away truly needed medications that lessen our pain on a daily basis. The chronic pain patient deserves to have some semblance of “normal” life. When they take away our pain medications, they are putting us back into our beds; where we are “sick” persons just waiting for relief.  Hoping and waiting for someone to help us “fix” this Opioid conundrum that is happening around us.

The problem that I have found during my research, is that these groups of people that have “power”; meaning the CDC, FDA etc.; are “lumping together” true chronic pain patients with the average drug addicts. We are not one in the same!  Apples are not oranges; just because both are called “fruits”. Dogs are not cats just because they are both animals. People who abuse drugs and chronic pain patients are not one in the same; just because both are human beings that need Opioids in order to live.  The craziness will not end and drug abuse problems and/or deaths will not be over, by taking Opioids from the true pain patients. The chronic pain community has been living in fear and agony since the new guidelines started. What I’m talking about is a real public health issue that is being made worse and not getting solved.  Denying the chronic pain community the one thing that may give us some small quality of life, is definitely not going to fix anything.

What I have noticed after speaking with a Governor’s secretary, a Senator and officials within my community, is that they don’t realize that there’s a difference between being an addict and being dependent physically. I heard a Senator say that she never thought about how a chronic pain patient may be physically dependent but not be “addicted” or crave the pain medications. They don’t truly understand that Opioids are sometimes the only choice and last resort. Some of us are not candidates for other treatment modalities. Frankly, there are others who just don’t want or cannot have another surgery that might increase pain and medical issues. I was told by one Senator, that we need to be a voice.  They need us to make phone calls, write letters and these kinds of articles. We need them to really listen and then make real changes.

The drug addict needs and craves their drug of choice in order to function. They get a “high” from taking drugs. They mix drugs and change medication from its original form sometimes, in order to get that “high” . A drug addict lives for their daily  “fix”.  The chronic pain patient, on the other hand, does not get a “high”from Opioids. We take prescribed pain medications in order to live some sort of life outside of our beds. We don’t live for the pain medications. We take them in order to have a life with lessened pain. The Opioids give a slightly higher quality of life to some of us and the unbending hand of the Government is slowly taking this quality of life away from us.

I totally agree, that Opioids should not always be the first drug of choice for chronic pain. There are other modalities to start with. But in the end, if the only thing that works for certain patients who live with daily debilitating pain, are Opioids; then these patients should be allowed to have them. The chronic pain patient should be allowed to live without feeling like a  criminal or as though we are “bad” or “flawed” people. We also should not have to take a slew of lesser medications in order to “try and fail” them before getting what a board certified pain Dr. may prescribe as first choice if his /her hands weren’t “tied”. The persons with power to do something about this debacle are continuing to deny tens of thousands of chronic pain patients the only treatment that may help lessen their pain, our pain, my pain.  They are holding us hostage to a life of agony and they need to be informed. Those persons who have the power to help chronic pain patients with this confused issue, are listening to  misinformation. They are looking at skewed  and manipulated data.  They are basing their choices, ideas and guidelines on poor medical analysis and data.

The guidelines for the use of Opioids in the medical setting should be changed immediately. Those persons on the committees who wrote these newer guidelines were those who have a monetary stake in getting rid of these medications. By this, I mean those who own other forms of treatment centers.They are also the “Prop” Dr.’s who have only one point of view and it’s not the same point of view as those who truly know what its like to live with daily chronic pain. The initial’s “PROP” stands for “Physicians for Responsible Opioid prescribing”.  But they don’t really approve of any kind of Opioid prescribing. They and others who wrote the current guidelines, want Opioids eliminated for the afore mentioned monetary reasons and due to the propaganda surrounding celebrities deaths from overdose.  In the celebrity cases, and many other high profile and even low profile deaths from overdose; there were other medications and street drugs mixed in with the Opioids. That is truly how those persons ended up dead.

The guidelines for the use of Opioids with chronic pain patients should be withdrawn now! They should be rewritten by a group that consists of board certified physicians who have true experience with chronic pain patients. Better yet, add some physicians who actually experience chronic pain themselves.  Excluded in the group to rewrite the guidelines, should be anyone with money to gain from getting rid of Opioid medications. Let’s get real! People die from NSAIDS! In fact, I’m not allowed to take them because of my chronic renal disease. Others die from Liver issues from taking too much Tylenol.

At one point, there was a group of U.S. Senators that introduced legislation to  put a federal tax on all Opioid medications! It was called the “Budgeting for Opioid Addiction Treatment Act”. In a nutshell, they wanted to make chronic pain patients pay one cent for each milligram of active opioid ingredient in their daily pain medications.  This money was then going to be used for treatment centers for drug addicts! How ludicrous is that?  Would anyone ever think about taxing my grandfather for taking insulin, because he is diabetic? Would they put a “fine” or so called “tax” on high blood pressure medications? NO! Nobody would place a “fine” or a “tax” on illnesses such as high blood pressure or diabetes, yet the medications taken for those illnesses also make people “dependent” on them. A person can’t just stop taking insulin or they could die! The heart medication that I take cannot be stopped abruptly, or I could have a heart attack! So you see, there are many medications that people may be “dependent” upon. That doesn’t make all sick persons “addicts”. We all take the medications that we need for our diagnosed medical conditions. The drug addict actively wants, craves and seeks out their drug of choice.  Those of us living with chronic pain truly wish that we didn’t need to take any medication. Chronic pain is an illness just like any other.

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