Anti-Opioid Zealots


I opened up facebook to see that a person who calls herself an “investigative reporter”; doesn’t actually have a clue about the subject for which she stands upon her soapbox and spews hate and prejudice! Her hate speeches, disdain, lack of knowledge & empathy for the chronic pain community are outrageous. She also states that she’s a pastors wife! Which in a stereotypical sense, should make her more kind, loving & empathetic (on the contrary). I’m definitely not a cold or callous person. I deeply care about others & especially my fellow chronic pain patients. But I pity her in her for the way she’s unable to get help for her grief. I’m terribly and deeply sorry for anyone who’s lost someone that they love to any kind of addiction. She lost an adult child to overdose of prescription opioids. She’s made it her fight in life now, to rid the world of the “evil narcotics”. Do you think she knows that the statistics prove that only 1-3% of prescription opioids ever result in overdose?Check out this new report from the Cato Institute

It’s the illicit fentanyl and Cara-fentanyl from Mexico & China that are the problem! It’s not legitimate chronic pain patients with legitimate prescriptions from licensed pain management physicians that are to blame for this manufactured “opioid crisis”. The opioids are only a tool. Just as guns, kitchen knives and cars are all tools. These tools don’t kill people any more than opioids “kill people”! There’s a genetic link to addiction. There’s also a distinct difference between addiction and being dependent physiologically to a medication that one has taken for several years to decades. With addiction, the addict must make a conscious decision to get the meds, tell lies, keeps secrets and physically take the increasing amounts of drugs to give them a “high” or a euphoric feeling! They ruminate look at the clock, just waiting for their next fix! Chronic pain patients, for the most part; were never given the “luxury” of a choice! Most are people living the rest of their lives with high amounts of ongoing daily chronic pain; with no end in sight! The average chronic Pain patient, is living a life sentence in agony through no fault of their own! Usually an unsuccessful surgery, freak accident or a motor vehicle accident. Today we have an “under & untreated pain crisis”, with suicides from pain mounting in numbers weekly. A very knowledgeable and vocal physician and chronic pain patient advocate, Dr Thomas Kline, MD, has kept a record of these rising number of suicides.

Chronic pain is in fact a disease; as explained in this article in Health Magazine (February 2016) and in many other news articles. It’s Origin is Neurological. Scientists now believe that one cause of chronic pain is a dysfunction of the nervous system & includes the misfiring of nerve signals long after an accident or injury. According to this article: http://amp.timeinc.net/health/health/condition-article/0,,20187942,00.html, Neurons (cells in the nervous system that communicate with each other) become overexcited and keep firing, even after the original cause (injury or illness, in some cases) has long since passed. The person receives persistent pain signals.

If I may be so bold as to speak for the majority of the chronic pain community, we are not insensitive or calloused persons. In fact, I’ve never met a more caring, empathetic group of citizens. We care very much that people have lost their family members to the disease of addiction. We grieve for their loss of lives and love.

But we are grieving too! We have had so many deaths due to either suicide, untreated or under treated chronic pain since the CDC Guidelines appeared in 2016. Read this: Article by Dr Jeffrey Singer MD, Cato Institute. Dr Singer states that, “patients have become the civilian casualties of the misguided policies addressing the opioid crisis.” These “guidelines”have somehow become “law” to the majority of anti-opioid zealots; along with many physicians and pharmacists!

I wrote to the CDC and if you look at their response to my letter here(*& in photo below) A Response letter sent to me, from Exec Secretary of CDC, they state that “the CDC Guidelines are not meant to be rule, regulation or law. It’s not intended to deny access to opioid pain medications as an option for pain management”. I also agree that nobody should be denied pain care. That these are just supposed to be nothing more than guidelines. They weren’t meant to become the Law!!

Now there are admissions of the over fabrication of statistics by the CDC. Also, the AMA has come out with their own resolutions to these Draconian CDC Guidelines. You can find what they’ve written in this article by The Pain News Network https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories/2018/11/14/ama-calls-for-misapplication-of-cdc-opioid-guideline-to-end

This person calls herself an investigative reporter. People like her feel that because they have an audience & a platform; that they can stand on their soapbox and spew misinformation and hatred due to unresolved feelings of loss and grief! But they are just plain wrong!

When I opened up Facebook to try and reason with her. To attempt to discuss and/or debate like adults; I found that her page was blocked from any comments or discussions. That’s when you know you’re on the side of light and good. When you’re willing to discuss hard subjects in a civilized manner. But when discussions are cut out and blocked; that’s when we know that a person just wants to pontificate and spew hate!

Lastly, I wanted to add that this person should be in violation of the ADA, for her written comments regarding Cindy Steinberg. She made derogatory remarks about Cindy, a very well known pain patient advocate and friend of mine! I don’t think she is allowed to say the things that she said about Cindy supposedly being “theatrical” because she used a cot in between her statements regarding the opioid hysteria. This reporter even went so far as to say that Cindy was “laying in her her cot while testifying to Congress.”! Gee, I saw the video and it sure appears that she’s sitting in a seat discussing the situation in an intelligent manner. Here is part of Cindy Steinberg’s message:

“In the near term, we can and must restore balance to opioid prescribing with depoliticized, rational and cleareyed recognition of the risks and benefits of these medications,” she said, according to her prepared remarks. “In the long term, we must invest in the discovery of new, effective, and safer options for people living with pain.”

What’s wrong with that message? How could any sane person find something incorrect or one-sided, with that direct quote”. On the contrary, Cindy spoke intelligently! She discussed ways to help end opioid hysteria and the under-treated/untreated pain crisis today!

Lastly, if this one-sided, so called “investigative reporter”, would share an ounce of the truth with her readers; she’d have not lied about Cindy “laying in a cot while testifying to Congress”. Cindy, as you can see from the video of her testimony, is sitting upright in a chair as she speaks to Congress. But would there have been a problem if she had been in a cot while testifying? NBC & this reporter could very well be violating the Americans with Disabilities Act? In what world is mocking a disabled person OK? Isn’t there an ADA law that calls for accommodating persons with a disability?

Below is a photo from a portion of the return response letter that I received from the Executive Secretary of the CDC:

Here are some great resources for those who are skeptical of my words here today:

  • ALSO: Here are a couple of articles written by the person being referred to in my article today:
  • Lastly, I just want to add (so that I an not accused of being a “mouthpiece” for the USPF) that I resigned from the US Pain Foundation in September 2018; after only 8 months as a Board Member & 3 1/2 years as a volunteer Ambassador. I was planning on staying to try and help them rebuild. But the moment that I felt my integrity was challenged, I resigned.
  • Please send Your comments Re: HHS Draft for Pain Best Practices


    Hello Luvs,

    I just wanted give my readers a little “nudge” & remind you all to visit the The HHS Task Force online, which has provided a 90 day public comment period (ending April 1st,2019)

    Click here to post your comments re: the HHS Draft for Best Practices (90 day comment period)

    ****In the Search Box, put these words so you’ll get to the correct place for commenting: HHS Draft for Best Practices.

    I implore you to send in your comments. This is our chance to have our voices heard. Please go to the above link, in order to have your voice heard regarding the Draft Report to HHS. * my comments are copied & pasted for you below.

    There are three different ways that you can send in your comments regarding this Draft report:

    **When you write, email or post your messages regarding the Draft Report, please refer to this Docket Number:HHS-OS-2018-0027

    How to Submit Comments:

    1) Visit this Federal Portal at: http://www.regulations.gov

     2). Or you may Email topaintaskforce@hhs.gov

    3) or use USPS and you may Mail written comments to:

    U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOffice of the Assistant Secretary for Health200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 736E,Attn: Alicia Richmond Scott, Task Force Designated Federal OfficerWashington, DC 20201

    These are my thoughts. I will be condensing them into being my comments to the HHS Best Practices (again, comment period goes until April 1,2019:

    • I agree with the “individualized patient centered care”. But allow the Dr./Patient relationship to the determine treatments. But don’t allow the government, pharmacists/pharmacies, to override the treatment, including type, class & dosage of pain medications. Pain management Drs. went through, in many cases; 14-15 years of extra education. They know more about what’s best for the patients.
    • Opioids taken as prescribed, have less harsh & lasting side-effects than many other medications that are prescribed freely for patients today (such as Bupenorphrine, Suboxone)
    • 1) Many medications can cause death, if an overdose occurs.  2) Many medications can cause physical dependence, including heart, blood pressure and even insulin.
    • Pain Medications shouldn’t be decided on by what illness(es) a patient is living with. Pain is subjective and the CDC, in their 2012 response to Andrew Kolodny, stated that there was no research to prove that there’s any difference between cancer and non-cancer pain. Mr. Kolodny was trying to say that cancer pain was the only worst pain. There are a number of illnesses nicknamed “the suicide disease”,( including: RSD/CRPS, A.S., T.M. & others). People with comorbid highly painful conditions, should not be lumped & labeled as a sum of their illnesses. Everyone metabolizes differently. Some people may do well on a certain medication, while it makes others desperately more ill (due to the horrible side effects).
    • Nothing should ever be dictated “across the board” . Never should one rule be applied to 100 million chronic pain Patients. Some people living with illnesses such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome, for example; don’t metabolize medication like most other people do. They may need a much higher dosage than what the recommended ceiling of 90MME allows. By the way, when did recommended become law?
    • The CDC Guidelines were supposed to be just recommendations for General practitioners. But not even a year later, pain management Drs started being hassled by the DEA & other government & law enforcement officials. In 2018, they turned into “laws”. In many cases, good Drs. Have been losing their livelihood, their entire life’s work, because the DEA thinks that they had too many pain patients taking higher doses of opioids! It’s normal that Pain clinics would have a much higher number of people taking higher dosages of opioids.
    • Many persons who are living with several lifelong chronic painful illnesses, do not wish to have: massage, Reike, acupuncture or anything involving touching. People for example with CRPS, (systemic especially), cannot bear the pain of touching like this.
    • Many of those who live with horribly painful Rheumatoid disease, Neuropathies, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome & others, may get worse from doing things like Yoga, Tai Chi and even PT. (I had 9 years of PT & it made me worse & not better,many times)
    • Meditation most often doesn’t work well for the patients living with anxiety &/or PTSD, for example. *If it does help a little; it still does not lower high amounts of pain for the rest of someones life. Not enough to give someone their life back after a catasrophic painful event.
    • Why should anyone be forced to get an invasive surgery over taking a simple oral pill? Again, any medication is dangerous if taken incorrectly or by a person other than the intended patient. Therefore demonizing only opioids makes no sense.
    • Many persons aren’t candidates for the SCS and/or intra-thecal pain pumps. Many living with several painful illnesses have also compromised immune systems (CVID +others).
    • It appears that nobody on this HHS task force lives with chronic pain, in high amounts, due to lifelong, high pain chronic illnesses? Because they should know that no amount of meditation, injections or tai chi, would end ongoing continuous life long chronic pain!
    • *meditation, music therapy and aqua therapy may help to lessen pain for a short period of time (**if the patient doesn’t have an aversion to being in water or have open sores due to secondary illnesses)
    • As you can see, there’s no one fix for everyone. Mostly because we are individuals who must have individualized care. Nobody should be putting one group of persons with physical chronic pain or PTSD, ahead of another group of survivors. You don’t know what horrors anyone has been through. A soldiers PTSD may be horrific. Also horrific may a grown up’s PTSD. Someone who had lived a life of horrors in their own home (which should’ve been a safe place), at the hands of abusive family members.
    • Please don’t prescribe dosage limits “across the board” for everyone. That’s not keeping with the physicians code of ethics “to do no harm”!
    • Don’t pick & choose what medication or dosage by each illness or condition. Some medications work for one person and don’t help others
    • Give the physician back their right(after years and years of education & experiences) to diagnose and treat people with ongoing lifelong pain. Keep the Dr/patient relationships together, without intrusion or interruption in patient care!
    • Please keep in mind that chronic pain does not = addiction.! Just because someone needs opioids to help high amounts of pain (*that will most often, never go away), does not make them an addict. It shouldn’t give them the label of “substance use disorder” either!
    • Do Not make the Hippa privacy laws a joke or obsolete. Confidentiality matters! In order to have any confidence in your health care team, you must trust them. What I’m saying is that the police departments and other employees of the government or anywhere, should NOT BE GIVEN ACCESS TO THE MAPS*! The MAPS are already invasive enough without giving access to everyone!

    There are a few good parts to the draft:

    • The suggestion to treat each patient on an individual, patient by patient basis.
    • Stop raiding innocent Drs offices.
    • Stop taking physicians livelihood/careers away because someone at the top of the ladder at the HHS, CDC or elsewhere; lost a brother, mother or best friend, to opioid abuse &/or addiction, that ended with a death, loss and then turned into bitterness!
    • Give more hours of education in pain management to medical students

    Lastly, opioids are a safe, effective and an inexpensive way to treat lifelong chronic pain, for many patients in this category. They help & work for so many! Especially legacy patients with multiple high pain comorbidities, depend on opioids to have some semblance of life. I know, because it happened to me and I lost my LA/ER pain medications in Sept 2018. I have a much less full life now.

    The PTSD, that chronic pain patients are living with after being legacy patients who had been doing well taking opioids for a decade or two or three, is a nightmare! People are becoming a shell of their former selves. Persons with multiple & painful comorbidities, who were able to possibly do a job, be a mother, father, caregiver or grandmother, while taking opioids (*also btw, never getting high from their opioids!); are doomed to live a half-life in bed or a recliner forever. Many are committing suicide.

    I read some nasty comments on an article recently (I’ll look for that article. Sorry, I can’t remember where I saw it, but I will find it and post for you asap). There were comments from a person who lost someone to an opioid overdose/addiction. She said she was  “tired” of hearing about pain patients contemplating suicide. Tired of seeing where chronic pain patients have written in whining that “if they don’t get their pain meds back they will kill themselves”. Well, I pity that lady because she’s obviously never gone through anything that involves long term, never ending high amounts of chronic pain. The chronic pain population needs to know that there is hope. Because someone doesn’t contemplate suicide, where there is “Hope”. So someone please tell that woman to “chill out” and to “be kind”. Also, tell her not to cut down, put down, belittle or be insidious about life long, never ending, high amounts of daily chronic pain.  Unless she is in my shoes/our shoes, our wheelchairs, walkers, crutchs, braces and motorized scooters, don’t judge!

    Unless you’ve lived with high levels of continuous chronic pain that you know will never ever stop; don’t judge the chronic pain patient who chooses suicide over being a burden to their loved ones. Maybe they have no loved ones and cannot bear to be alone forever with such high amounts of under-treated or untreated pain? Don’t judge someone who’s been doing well for over a decade and suddenly they lose their pain relief and they’ve resorted to “living” a half-life in their bed or a recliner.

    These drafts really need more work. There are a lot of contradictions. Tylenol/Acetaminophen is very dangerous and can kill it cause liver failure if taken continuously. Which is what a chronic pain patient will need! NSAID’s cause kidney failure and anyone who thinks Tylenol or Aspirin will help pain levels at a 7,8 or above; doesn’t know anything about pain. In fact, they’ve never lived with ongoing chronic pain illnesses that are Incurable.

    Lastly, meditation, grounding, yoga & aqua therapy are nice for PT patients rehabilitating. They’re fine for some people as an addition to pain medication therapy. But they’ll never work alone to end or relieve high amounts of pain for a person who will most likely need pain control forever. It’s just impossible for anyone to go several times weekly and pay for PT forever! Not everyone has access to a pool. Then there are those of us who have open sores from secondary illnesses or from systemic autoimmune and other issues. I’m sorry, but “grounding” is just silly and I’m entitled to my opinions; as are each one of us.

    The above paragraphs are my thoughts about some of the HHS Draft for Pain Best Practices. I’ve got to condense these thoughts so that I can actually leave a comment. With the government shut-down, I’m not sure exactlly what will be happening to this side of things? If I find out any more, I promise to inform all of you.  But lets still get those comments posted before April 1, 2019. If we follow the rules, then hopefully someone will hear us. If we wait to see what happens, it may be too late.

    Remember not to be long winded. My comments will be condensed version of my issues with the HHS Draft. I will post it for you once I’ve gotten it all set up on the .gov website). Tell them who you are and how you feel about the HHS Draft for Pain Best Practices. Let them know that there are many contradicions in this draft. There are so many things wrong with telling someone who is living with #’s 7,8 or 9 on the pain scale, to take NSAID’s or Acetamenophin. Theres definitely something ludicrous about taking opioids away from someone who’s been doing great with them for a decade or two or three. Opioids are harmless, with very low or no side effects. When taken properly as prescribed for long term chronic intractable pain.  On the other hand, if you research Suboxone and Bupenorphrine. They have horrific side effects and you cannot taper off of them slowly because the medication works against you if you attempt to do this. I have  received several written accounts from chronic pain patients who believed in their physicians and blindly took what was offered to help their pain, as a last resort. They thought it would be better than nothing. (*these accounts will be in a future blog post).

    MY OWN COMMENTS:

    I have been living with high amounts of chronic pain on a daily basis since a catastrophic car accident in 2002. I did all that was asked of me as far as having 8 surgeries, 9 years of PT, 3 years of TBI rehab and 3 years worth of pain clinic Biofeedback and  injections to my knees, shoulders, neck and spine.  I am not a candidate for a pain pump, due to CVID. I tried many medications and most either made me deathly ill or just had horrible side effects that added to the pain. My story is not unique. Many thousands of chronic pain patients attempt to do all that they can do, prior to taking opioid pain medication. When pain is lifelong, whether you are old or young; the idea of staying in a state of high chronic daily pain for decades upon decades, is daunting.

    This draft needs much more work. There are too many contradictions.  There especially needs to be more done for the legacy patients who have been doing well on Opioid therapy for chronic pain.  Legacy patients, like me, are being put into “no win” situations. We have had our medications forcibly taken after doing relatively well for years. Forced tapering is bad for anyone.  It is life altering, dangerous and has taken lives. Why would you mess with something that is not broken?  If someone has been doing well, how could you fathom stopping the regimen that gave them some semblance of a life?  Then what? Then these people are unkowingly prescribed horrible meds like Buprenorphrine / Suboxone.  After much research, it seems like most of this manufactured “opioid hysteria” is for money making. That is shameful to use and even kill innocent people just to allow someone else to get rich.

    Why are we making insurance companies pay for all of this acupuncture, massage and yoga etc? Those dont work for long term chronic high pain illnesses where the patient deteriorates as the years go by. The majority of chronic pain patients that I know, say that they don’t want to be poked or even touched, because it hurts too much. This is not a solution. Please try to understand the reality of this situation. Don’t allow people who are living with high emotions, to be in positions of power, in charge of important decisions for the chronically ill. Persons with powerful positions who are greiving & who have lost someone from an overdose shouldn’t be making decisions that affect & involve millions of lives. Most people who have lost a family member or close friend from an overdose, won’t be rational in their decision making. Then they end up punishing an entire community of innocent people because they lost someone (*usually their loved one had overdosed by taking someone else’s prescription or illegal/illicit drugs to numb psychological pain).

    Please stop demonizing Opioids and selling the idea that these inanimate objects cause addictions and drug overdose. Addiction is a gene that someone is born with. It shows up in some people and not others. Opioids do not kill people any more than guns kill people. It is when the opioids or the guns who get into the wrong hands. Then the people behind them choose to make terrible decisions and others then die from drug overdose, homicide or suicide. Please remember that opioids are inexpensive, accessible (or they were) and they have few or no side effects. They have been helping many chronic pain patients for years and years. The medications are not “bad”, it is the people who obtain them illegally and then do things to the medications or with them, other than the intended purpose. That is what is dangerous and killing people. 

    Chronically ill persons living with high pain illnesses cannot take Tylenol or NSAID’s for the rest of their lives without horrible effects and outcomes. Those medications are not made for long term. They cause liver and kindney failure and worse. Also, this same group of ill citizens, are usually unable to do or pay for complimentary therapy treatments for decades at a time. Lastly, please leave the pain care physcians or any physician trained properly in the management of chronic intractable pain, to make the decisions that affect the pain community. These Dr’s have been highly educated for many extra years, in order to learn how to treat chronic pain.  Stop politicians, PROP, Addiction specialists, pharmacists, the CDC, FDA  and insurance companies from making medical decisions that should be left up to the Dr. and patients themselves. Thank you! Sincerely, Suzanne Stewart

    Health experts offer solutions for unintended consequences of opioid crackdown | Fox News


    Hello Luvs,

    This information came to me via an email & so I wanted to share it with you:

    The most urgently needed first step to addressing the misunderstandings about Centers for Disease and Prevention opioid prescribing guidelines, many clinicians and health experts say, is for the agency to clarify – in a high-profile way– what the guidelines were meant, and not meant, to do.
    — Read on www.foxnews.com/health/undoing-the-harm-of-the-response-to-the-opioid-overdose-epidemic-health-experts-suggest-solutions.amp

    Also, here is The Fox News Sequence of Stories Regarding the Opioid Hysteria & Chronic Pain Patients .

    One of several very special physicians, who’ve been helping fight for the rights of Drs and chronic pain patients is Dr Stefan Kertesz, MD. He is quoted in this article on Fox News:

    • “We’re targeting the most vulnerable and sickest people who have been on opioids a long time”.

    Dr. Stefan Kertesz, addiction specialist and professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine.

    Richard Lawhern, a very staunch advocate for chronic pain patient community; is also quoted in this report. He is also advocating for his wife daughter, who live with chronic pain. Here is the quote from Richard aka “Red” Lawhern:

    • “The [CDC opioid guideline] document is fatally flawed and needs to be withdrawn for a major revision in an open public process by qualified experts in community practice for chronic pain treatment, assisted by representatives or advocates from chronic pain communities.”

    — Richard Lawhern

    Lastly, Lauren Deluca, founder of Chronic Illness Advocacy & Awareness Group“,(an ever growing & popular Non profit 501/3c) is quoted here:

    • “Too many flawed approaches and policies targeting pain patients, she said, “will take many years to undo, but we can’t wait years.”
    • She also was quoted as saying this: I myself was a healthy 36-year-old professional embarking on starting a family and in a blink of an eye my life was destroyed due to a denial of care,” Deluca said. “It’s not just about pain; it’s about quality of life. Now we are teaching doctors to ignore pain, which not only leaves the patient suffering but likely will lead to many not getting diagnosed, therefore not only will they not receive pain medications they will not even receive basic care.”

    Please read the entire Fox News series of three stories. They are focused on different aspects of this Opioid Hysteria. Also the lack of treatment and compassionate care for the chronic pain community. *The current story, (3rd in a sequence of three), and the other stories in the sequence can be located above. They are the first two, blue hyperlinks, near the top of this blog post.

    Lastly, I wanted to share something on the same subject but different platform. As I mentioned above, Lauren Deluca is the founder of CIAAG. (a Non Profit 501 c-3. The link to her group website is above, but let me add it here for you as well: Chronic Illnesses Advocacy: & Awareness Group)

    Link to The Documentary Trailer “Untreated: The Healthcare Crisis”

    She recently attended an International Meeting with the United Nations in Vienna. According to her website, Lauren spoke about the inhumane  treatment chronic pain patients are facing due to the ‘Opioid Crisis’ in the United States. 

    Here’s is a link to get you to a YouTube video that shows her speaking in person at the event:

    United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime: 61st Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    Please look over everything, that I’ve tried to present to you in one neat little blog post. I hope that you feel updated and possibly more optimistic about the changes coming in this New Year, 2019.

    Something must be done to change the deplorable conditions that have been put upon the chronic pain community! These great leaders and others, working together as a united front; that is how we are going to help make the changes that we need to see happen this new year!

    Thank you for coming back to visit and read “Tears of Truth”.

    They Fell like Dominos: My License, My Certification, My Profession


    Hello Luvs,This blog post is actually something that was written and sent to me by Dr Mark Ibsen, MD, a physician from Helena, MT. He wrote and says:

    “I had similar experience. 
    Guilty. 
    Not even “guilty until proven innocent”
    Just guilty. 
    Once they set their sights on you,
    You
    Are
    Fkkd. 

    This system is feudal. 
    Primitive. 
    Insensitive. 
    Ineffective. 
    Unchecked, as in no checks or balances. 
    Run by appointed people who are completely unaccountable. 
    No recourse. 
    In the name of “safety”, 
    With no evidence of harm. 
    Like a trip to the Gulag. 

    The key is for patients to realize that doctors have become so vulnerable that we cannot risk ANY exposure to ANY accusations. 
    A risk-averse environment due to the hostile regulatory environment we now have. 

    So, as more and more patients despair over being abandoned by this system, the sacred physician patient relationship is further tarnished. 

    I, for one, will continue to stand by the patients I can, and pray for those I cannot.” 

    Here’s the article that accompanied the email from Dr Mark Ibsen, MD:

    They Fell like Dominos: My License, My Certification, My Profession

    Mark Ibsen MD
    Helena MT

    AMA Guidelines


    Hello Luvs,

    I wanted to make sure that you all have heard about the new AMA Resolutions, regarding the CDC Guidelines for opioid prescribing? The guidelines that have been taken as the “word and the law” by many pain management physicians and others.

    Those CDC Guidelines are and were supposed to be voluntary and just be what they’re called, “Guidelines”. Doctors, pharmacists and government officials have been turning them into “law”. Many people in the chronic pain community have been negatively affected, including me!

    I wanted to post a copy of just the AMA resolutions that pertain to us; the chronic pain community. Below I will have that available for you to print. You should take it with you to each Dr appointment & especially your pain physician. But first let me give you the link to the full AMA Resolutions here: The AMA Resolutions for Chronic Pain Patients

    *(The above link is working again)

    ***Also, I’ve posted just the AMA Resolutions pertaining to the chronic pain patients: Please be sure to print out and take to each of your physicians & especially your pain Physician:

    Sending Hope, Light & Peace!

    Suzanne

    Protected: What Really Happened Between NPR, USPF and Me?


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    The Opioid Hysteria Hits Home


    Hello Luvs,

    I wanted to write to you today to share with you something that I know many of us are dealing with these days. It’s about what happened at my pain management Dr. appointment on 11-8-18. First of all, every 30 days, I have to go and endure this treatment and I live with PTSD. It always rears its ugly head the day prior to my appointment with this Dr. or any new Dr. appointments. I’ll just refer you to my other article “Down the Rabbit Hole” if you need a reminder as to what has occurred up until now.

    I arrived at the appointment which was in the late morning this time. I usually go in the afternoon because mornings are difficult for me, with my pain issues. But the past 6 months or so, I’ve had horrible anxiety when I know this appointment is drawing nearer. The closer it gets, the worse I start to feel psychologically and physically with the above symptoms on top of the pain. I decided to make this appointment in the morning because I thought it would not ruin our day so much. Just “get it over with” and be done; get on with our day. But it once again, did ruin my/our day.

    I’ve had this pain management Dr. since July 2015, after my other Dr. of 15 years left suddenly. At that time I had been on the fentanyl patch and the lollipops for 10 years. This Dr. told me he would only accept me if I took myself off of the lollipops and I did it. I had to suffer through physical dependence withdrawals. I did it at home with my soulmate, my husband.

    I’ve never rescheduled an appointment with him, nor have I ever been late. I’ve never run out of meds or asked for them early.  He knows of every medication that I take or have taken and honestly, I don’t feel like its up to me to have to “remind” him that I sometimes take Fiorcet for Chiari Migraines. He and I had a mutual respect sort of Dr./patient relationship up until April of this year 2018.  But that day everything changed and it turned out to be nothing that I did wrong. He had forgotten that I take Fiorcet and it doesn’t always show up on MAPS (Michigan Automated Prescription Service – *explanation found here*: https://www.michigan.gov/lara/0,4601,7-154-72600_72603_55478—,00.html) because its such a low risk medication and not a high class either.  But whether it shows up on the MAPS is not up to me. Nor is it my fault in any way if it shows up or not, as long as he’s known from the beginning that I’ve been on it for more than 7 years.  This one particular day in April, he started being rude to me for no reason whatsoever. I went to my appointments in May, June and July.  But I was horribly anxious and very “ill” prior to each appointment, due to anxiety and PTSD symptoms.

    This last visit was another horrible appointment and was possibly the final one for me. I am done being treated like a criminal or an addict! I’m tired of feeling “put down”! I’ve never smoked or drank; nor have I ever taken any drugs. I received one more short acting script and now I will be tapering myself slowly off of the short acting medication as well. It will be horrible because it’s already horrible. It will be difficult and it’s already difficult.  He lied to me in July, telling me that “in Michigan, Fentanyl patch is illegal for him to prescribe (he is a pain management Dr. and Anesthesiologist MD), unless someone has malignant cancer”. I know this is not true and he told me that “I am smart and should be able to verify this online”.  I checked Michigan law and the fentanyl patch warning on the box. It says only that it is “for chronic long term moderate to severe pain that will not be going away.” If anyone has any idea where I can find this in writing; I welcome that information.

    I got a letter from my GI Dr. (*see letter below) because he felt it was dangerous to take me off of the Fentanyl patch. With Gastroparesis, SIBO and Chronic Erosive Gastritis; along with EDS type 4/vascular and more, I am not able to metabolize the long acting oral meds. Believe, me, I’ve tried many things and either was allergic, got very ill, it did not help at all or it had large valleys and spikes. The patch just worked for my pain and it was the best match for me and my multiple co-morbidities.

    Yesterday’s appointment he told me that “Chronic pain does not kill anyone”. I told him that I was in my recliner now 16+ hours per day due to the pain. He responded by telling me that my cardiologist should not have put me on Clonidine. I’ve been on it since 2015, but went off of it for awhile in between. He knew this also but apparently it slipped his mind because that must be what’s making me “tired.” But in reality, it’s the pain that’s keeping me down. Also, I only get about 4 hours of sleep on a good night.

    My cardiologist told me to take 1/2 of only 1mg at night. He prescribed it for me and said it would help with the physical pain & dependence withdrawals. Thank goodness someone cared enough to help me a bit!

    I tried to explain that I had resigned from many activities that I was able to do with the medications. He told me that none of this has to do with the medication for pain being taken away after 14 years. He went on to say that “Susan (you’d think after 3.5 years he’d get that my name is “SUZANNE” not “Susan), you and other chronic pain patients are hostages to the pain medications”. These are the same medications that he was fine with for the 3.5 years I’ve been going to him! He also knew that my history was even longer. I’ve been taking opioids since 2005, in order to have some semblance of a life. But just for the record, I’ll let you know that I tried everything else possible fir 3 years, before resorting to the opioids.

    This pain management Dr. has told me all along that he cannot make my pain go away. But he can help lessen the pain by prescribing opioids. When he made the “hostage” comment, I responded with; well “instead , now I’m a hostage to the pain”. Yesterday he told us (my husband & me), that all of his patients still tell him they have pain “with or without the pain meds”. I responded by telling him “Yes, that is true, but I had a life with the meds and I have no quality of life now. The pain medication dulled the pain without ever giving me any kind of “high”. Now the pain is much more sharp, pronounced and at the front of my thoughts. I’m not able to concentrate much or put the pain in another place at the back of my brain.”

    I started to explain to him that I have several “Physicians, pain physicians and nurses that are my friends online”.  I added that this past week I was diagnosed after an echocardiogram, with “left atrium enlargement”. I’ve had a heart attack, a CVA and a TIA twice. I have Atrial fibrillation, Sick Sinus Syndrome and a pacemaker since 2003. I’ve never had CHF but that’s what this means. I told him that “chronic pain can kill and under treated chronic pain can make blood sugar and blood pressure rise”, which has been happening to me.  He became very upset with me and started to pontificate about how “each symptom needs to be treated by a Dr. who takes care of that problem.  If my blood sugar is high, I need to go to a diabetes Dr. and if my blood pressure is too high, then I need that addressed by a physician who takes care of that issue. He went on to say that “chronic long term pain does not and cannot kill you.  Only acute pain can possibly make BP and HR etc. rise.” But from Dr. Tennant’s own account in his article (Practical Pain Mgmt. By Dr Forrest Tennant MD , from another article, by Pharmacist Steve Ariens, ( Harmful Effects of Untreated Pain )  and this article that I had written last year (that was also published in Ntl. Pain Report), “Chronic pain can kill” (Untreated Chronic Pain Can Lead to Sudden Cardiac Death ), he is the one who is lying.

    g

    Untreated: The Healthcare Crisis-A Documentary


    There are several people and organizations making Documentaries about pain patients getting “left behind” in all of the opioid hysteria right now.  A few that I’ve personally taken an interest in, are awesome. I feel that some Organizations, are trying to sway the chronic pain community into thinking that the physicians who are afraid to treat them now with any opioid therapy are correct in doing so.  There are those who promote techniques such as “grounding”, massage therapy, acupuncture and mindfulness as relief for life long chronic & painful illnesses.  There is a place for some of those things. If it is the patients choice, they could be added to other type of medicinal therapies, such as CBD oil, Medical cannabis, Kratom and/or Opioids.  But alone, these “alternative pain control therapies ” don’t help to control chronic &/or intractable pain permanently.  They also won’t help much when someone is living with high amounts of chronic pain from several illnesses on a daily basis. In my opinion, they won’t help someone who had been doing well on other medication therapies for many years and who suddenly got force tapered or stopped from something that gave them some semblance of a life, for over a decade in many cases.

    But there is a new documentary coming out soon and it appears to be one of the best that I’ve seen. It looks very professional and it is in no way a “home video” or a “YouTube” video. It appears to be very well done and I really thought the message was and is clear.  Get the government out of the Doctor and patient exam rooms and relationships. Give the physicians back the power to decide along WITH their patients, what method is best suited for the control of their pain. Keep Hollywood, Andrew Kolodny and Dr. Phil out of our personal medical histories and give the chronic pain community back their lives. We are not expendable just because many are unable to work. Most of us worked for many years and paid into the Social Security program and had to have enough “points” from working, in order to receive the SSDI. So we are not “leaches” nor are we taking from our Government.  Most have been very dedicated to helping in society and being a part of every day life. Many chronic pain patients are former chefs, Interpreters, Secretaries and even teachers. Give us the benefit of the doubt and stop treating us like we are unworthy or expendable.

    This documentary “Untreated: The Healthcare Crisis” is directed and produced by Time Thread Studios & their production crew, alongside Lauren DeLuca and Jayne Flanders. Lauren & Jayne are the original founders of CIAAG or “Chronic Illness Advocacy and Awareness Group”. They have a support group online and run a Nonprofit for chronically ill and disabled persons living with pain.  I have donated a small amount of $25.00 to this documentary because I believe in it. If you can contribute in any way, even $5.00 would help. If many people could donate even that amount, it would really help in getting this documentary out to the public.  What is stated in this documentary is true; “What we have is an epidemic of ignorance and fear and its ruining healthcare “.  The epidemic is not an “Opioid Epidemic” but one of instilling fear and panic to the non-pain community so they won’t truly understand.  Not until they or someone that they love is living with daily chronic pain and suffering due to the under treatment of pain today in the USA and Canada.

    You’ll see in the movie’s trailer, that even the CEO of Reckitt Benckiser, Rakesh Kapoor has stated that “every major deal we’ve done actually, has created good value for share holders”. They are the makers of Suboxone, Bupenorphrine etc.  If you read a couple of my other articles (About Suboxone, Bupenorphrine & Naloxone and another Regarding Bupenorphrine- Suboxone and also Pain, Politics, Suboxone & Bupenorphrine ) regarding these drugs made for addiction, not pain; I believe that you will see a trail of money leading directly from them to this fake and manufactured Opioid “crisis”. “The goal is profits”, it says in the documentary’s trailer. It is without regard to the millions of chronic pain patients.  This movie will show how the Government is trying to control this “crisis” by limiting the supply of opioids for the pain community. It is stated that 319 medications have “no competition”.  The question arises “Is the FDA dragging their feet?” Also you will see that physicians are afraid to prescribe pain medications and we all know that is true. Then there is this statement, that “the intentional removal of effective pain medications”…. from people who live with daily chronic and high pain illnesses, “that is the definition of torture”.

    The link to “Kickstarter.com” and the movie trailer is listed below. You’ll notice on the Kickstarter website that they have goals and various gifts for supporting this film.

    Please check out this documentary and lets truly try to get this movie out to the public via Netflix and other venues. This documentary has our hearts and our souls in it. It is, in my opinion, a really effective trailer and the documentary, I believe, will even exceed our expectations.  “The pendulum has swung much too far in the wrong direction”, is another quote from “Untreated: The Pain Crisis” movie trailer. Please help by any donation that you can spare and/or by sharing the link below and/or this article to people in your own pain communities.

    Click below, to see the trailer:

    Untreated: The Healthcare Crisis Movie Trailer

    Letter To Brandeis University


     The letter below was written by Richard “Red” Lawhern & signed by many Physicians, Pharmacists, Nurses and pain patients/Advocates (Including Me). It was sent approximately October 2017. Here’s a full article from the Pain News Network about it: https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories/2017/10/3/patient-advocates-call-on-brandeis-to-fire-kolodny and below is the letter in full, and which I signed:(my name is in bold print just here to share with you)….sadly, it didn’t do anything, but seemed to give Kolodny more resolve. We need to keep fighting this! We cannot give up. I’ve lost my LA/ER pain meds now and I’m not stopping the fight until my last breath. Here’s the letter in full:

    To:  Ronald D. Liebowitz, President, Brandeis University [president@brandeis.edu]

           Nancy Winship, Chief Philanthropic Adviser to the President, Brandeis University 

    winship@brandeis.edu  

           Constance Horgan, Founding Director, Brandeis University Institute for Behavioral Health,  [horgan@brandeis.edu]

            David Weil, Dean, The Heller School of Social Policy and Manageme  [davweil@brandeis.edu]

           Mark Allen Surchin, President, Brandeis Alumni Association msurchin@goodmans.ca

        To the Administration of Brandeis University,

    I write as corresponding secretary of the Opioid Policy Correspondents List.  We are a group of medical professionals, healthcare writers, social media group moderators, knowledgeable chronic pain patients and family members.  This group of volunteers receives no funding from any source.

    We call upon the Opioid Research Collaborative and Brandeis University to immediately reevaluate your relationship with Dr. Andrew Kolodny, MD and to consider termination of his relationship with Brandeis.  The basis of our request is as follows:

       1.  Many of us are patients dealing with medical disorders thatcause levels of intractable pain among the most severe known to medical practice.  Others are physicians and nurses who have treated such disorders, most of which are incurable at the present state of medical knowledge.  Several of us have published work on this area of public policy and are highly conversant with the practice standards issues involved.

       2.  For millions of Americans, prescription opioid analgesic medications are a central element of patient pain management plans.  Without compassionate care employing these analgesics, many tens (perhaps hundreds) of thousands of patients will lapse into agony and disability.  Some will very likely die. We have each been witness already to multiple unnecessary deaths reported in social media and in articles by medical professionals. 

       3.  Chronic pain patients are increasingly being denied access to these essential life supports — in large measure due to the actions and advocacy of Dr. Andrew Kolodny and like-minded others. 

       4.  Because of genetic polymorphism, many pain patients are “hyper metabolizers” or “poor metabolizers” of one or more opioid medications.  Opioids are broken down in their livers at much faster or slower rates than in average patients.  To manage their pain, many require much higher doses than the 90 Morphine Milligram Equivalent Daily Dose (MMEDD) threshold of risk that is asserted in the March 2016 CDC opioid prescription guidelines.  No provision is made in the guidelines for hundreds of thousands of such people.  Based on his published work, Dr. Kolodny seems to ignore that such people even exist, despite the well established body of science thatdetails their conditions.

       5.  Dr. Kolodny has been prominent in a National campaign to deny chronic pain patients even minimal management of their pain.  His actions are directed toward forcing draconian restrictions or outright withdrawal of this class of medications from medical practice. He calls for forced tapering of patients formerly prescribed opioids. Policy positions for which he advocates are leading to the deaths of hundreds of chronic pain patients by suicide or pain-related heart failure and medical collapse — also incontestable facts that Kolodny has publicly denied.

       6.  Dr. Kolodny was a central figure in panels that wrote the 2016 CDC opioid guidelines.  The resulting document is widely understood by medical professionals to be profoundly flawed and actively dangerous.  The guidelines incorporate gross errors, anti-opioid bias, cherry-picking of published findings to support a political agenda, and omission of pertinent research thatcontradicts guideline recommendations.  As a consequence of these distortions and of a related US DEA witch hunt against pain doctors, large numbers of physicians are leaving pain management and hundreds of thousands of patients are being deserted and abused across America.

       7.  Dr. Kolodny may also have failed to acknowledge financial and professional conflicts of interest incompatible with the work he was hired to perform at Brandeis. He helped to found and runPhysicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP), an anti-opioid lobbying group.  This organization has several times petitioned the FDA to restrict opioids (many aspects of PROP petitions have been outright rejected as unfounded).   He has also been Chief Medical Officer for Phoenix House, a chain of addiction treatment centers which has been challenged over deaths among those they have treated and released without follow-up or community support.   He has represented the interests of insurance industry groups that seek to deny coverage to chronic pain patients because of associated expenses. None of these affiliations is compatible with balanced or science-based positions on opioid policy.

       8. Some who have described Dr. Kolodny in public press have characterized him as “controversial”.  This designation is entirely too kind.  Among people in pain, he is one of the most polarizing and hated figures in medicine.  His public statements are widely rejected by those whom they directly affect.

       9.  Although Dr. Kolodny has a work history in public health and addiction psychiatry, he is neither qualified nor Board Certified in pain management — a closely related field that has been profoundly and negatively impacted by his assertions concerning public policy.  From his published articles and interviews, it is clear to many readers that he knows or cares little about chronic pain patients and their treatment.  A lot of what he thinks he knows about addiction is unsupported or contradicted by medical evidence and by the lived experience of many thousands of patients.    

      10.  In our view and those of many people whom he has harmed, Dr. Kolodny makes no positive contribution to the work or reputation of Brandeis or its research centers.  To the contrary, we believe it is ethically and morally imperative that he be dismissed immediately from the University, before his presence further damages both your reputation and your financial endowments.  We urge you to engage staff in a due-diligence review of his published positions and advocacy, to verify the concerns we have offered above.  

    You surely cannot align yourselves with someone who has made the following kinds of public statements:

    “We lack evidence that opioids help chronic pain. Evidence is mounting that tapering improves pain and function.”   [From a Tweet by Dr. Kolodny addressing his statements in a CNN article at http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/17/health/chronic-pain-opioid-tapering-study/index.html ]

    “When we talk about opioid pain medications, drugs like hydrocodone and oxycodone, we’re talking about drugs that are made from opium the same way that heroin is made from opium.  The effect that hydrocodone and oxycodone produce in the brain are indistinguishable from the effects that are produced by heroin.  [When] We talk about opioid pain medicines we are essentially talking about heroin pills…”  Summer 2017 issue of Heller Magazine

    “Prescribing opioids for chronic pain is pennywise and pound foolish….” …”overprescribing of opioids is associated with sharp increases in the prevalence of opioid addiction, a chronic disease that is expensive to treat and strains the economy in many other ways. Some of these costs were nicely outlined in a recent New York Times article called “The Soaring Cost of the Opioid Economy.” 

    “We’re just talking about the economic costs but we also have to consider human costs. By prescribing opioids to chronic pain patients, a treatment that’s unlikely to work and may even worsen pain, the medical community is undertreating pain and failing in its responsibility to ease suffering. And if the pain patient becomes opioid addicted, they’ll be left with a devastating chronic disease that may kill them. Of course, there’s also the collateral suffering experienced by friends and family members, especially when an opioid addicted individual dies from an overdose.” https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/2013/10/24/qa-andrew-kolodny-busting-pain-medicine-myths-0

     

    “Outside of palliative care, dangerously high doses should be reduced even if patient refuses.  Where exactly is this done in a risky way?” wrote Andrew Kolodny, MD, Executive Director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP).  “I’m asking you to point to a specific clinic or health system that is forcing tapers in a risky fashion. Where is this happening?”   

    https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories/2017/7/20/prop-founder-calls-for-forced-opioid-tapering

     

     

     

    Among many published articles that contradict positions advocated by Dr. Kolodny are the following:

    Neat, Plausible, and Generally Wrong: A Response to the CDC Recommendations for Chronic Opioid Use, by Stephen A. Martin, MD, EdM;  Ruth A. Potee, MD, DABAM; and  Andrew Lazris, MD.  https://medium.com/@stmartin/neat-plausible-and-generally-wrong-a-response-to-the-cdc-recommendations-for-chronic-opioid-use-5c9d9d319f71

    Opioid Abuse in Chronic Pain — Misconceptions and Mitigation Strategies, Nora D. Volkow, MD, and A. Thomas McLellan, Ph.D.  N Engl J Med 2016; 374:1253-1263, March 31, 2016.

    The MEDD myth: the impact of pseudoscience on pain research and prescribing-guideline development  Jeffrey Fudin, Jacqueline Pratt Cleary, and Michael E Schatman,  J Pain Res. 2016; 9: 153–156. Reprint at Medscape:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809343/

    An Opioid Quality Metric Based on Dose Alone? 80 Professionals Respond to NCQA  Stefan Kertesz, MD, MSc. Medium, March 22, 2017. https://medium.com/@StefanKertesz/an-opioid-quality-metric-based-on-dose-alone-80-professionals-respond-to-ncqa-6f9fbaa2338

    Pain Wars, Suzanne Stewart, Opinion, National Pain Report, September 20, 2017,  http://nationalpainreport.com/the-pain-wars-8834381.html

    Let’s Stop the Hysterical Rhetoric about the Opioid Crisis, Jeffrey A Singer, MD, Cato Institute, August 31, 2017. https://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/lets-stop-hysterical-rhetoric-about-opioid-crisis

    Even the most basic due diligence will find many more substantive contradictions to Dr. Kolodny’s public statements. 

    This issue is not going to go away.  Brandeis needs to act promptly and decisively to preserve your academic reputation,lest you provide a forum for biased science or fraud.  We look forward to your confirmation that action is underway to separate Dr. Kolodny from your institution.  

    Note:  you may also receive amplifying letters from others among our membership.  

    All of the following have authorized their do-signatures here:

     

    Richard A. Lawhern, Ph.D., Healthcare author and 20-year patient advocate
    Corresponding Secretary, Opioid Policy Correspondents List

     

    Dr. Forest Tennant, Editor Emeritus “Practical Pain Management”

     

    Dr. Aimee Chagnon, MD

     

    Dr. Steven R. Henson, MD

     

    Dr. Mark Ibsen, MD

     

    Steven Ariens, P.D., R.Ph. Owner/Operator “Pharmacist Steve Blog”

     

    Thomas N. Dikel, Ph.D., Developmental Psychopathologist; Pediatric Neuropsychologist; Adult and Child Clinical Forensic Psychologist.

     

    Jon Aumann, certified in Community Based Participatory Research and as Biomedical Research Investigator

     

    Kristie Walters, RN, medically retired as a chronic pain patient

     

    Jennifer Barnhouse, LPN, medically retired as a chronic pain patient

     

    Julianna Hodgman, RN, Chronic Pain Patient

    Michelle Wagner Talley MSRC, LPC, BCPC

     

    Patricia Davidson, medically retired EMT, 12 year chronic pain patient

     

    Duane Pool, Former Registered Nurse, Technical Writer, Social Media Consultant

     

    Kristen Ogden, Co-founder Families for Intractable Pain Relief

     

    Louis Ogden, chronic pain patient and advocate

     

    Sherry Sherman, CRNP, MSN, BSN, CPC, CCS, CCA, CPPM, US Pain Ambassador,            NAPW 2014 Woman of the Year 

    Tammi Hale, surviving spouse of a pain patient suicide

     

    Angelika Byczkowski, chronic pain patient, advocate, writer, and blogger

     

    Donna Corley, Co-director ASAP – Arachnoiditis Society for Awareness and Prevention  

     

    Denise R. Molohon, LTCP, CLTC, chronic pain patient, patient advocate: ASAP, Arachnoiditis Society for Awareness & Prevention

     

    Susan J Elliott, chronic pain patient

     

    Duff Lambros, chronic pain patient stable on opioids over 20-years of treatment 

     

    Suzanne Stewart, chronic pain patient, patient health advocate, CRPS Mentor, blogger & freelance writer (>30 articles in National Pain Report).

    Mark J. Zobrowski, chronic pain patient and advocate

     

    Spencer Dunstan: chronic pain patient and advocate

     

    Sandie Hamilton, Community Care Coordinator, Hope Outreach Ministries

     

    Timothy E. Mason, BA Chemistry, Research Chemist

     

    Kevin Mooney, chronic pain patient

     

    Michelle Ziemba, Writer and Editor, Chronic Pain Patient: Trigeminal Neuralgia (13.5 years),

     

    Robert W. Schubring, BA, U.S. Co-Founder, GivePainAVoice

     

    Gary Snook, chronic pain patient

     

    Shirley Wallace, chronic pain patient

     

    Sally Balsamo, chronic pain patient

     

    Nancy Calahan, chronic fibromyalgia patient, prescribed Tramadol

     

    Caryn Abrams, chronic pain patient

     

    Sandy Hamilton, chronic pain patient

    Lisa Hess, chronic pain patient

     

    Steven Rock, chronic pain patient

     

    Tootie Welker, MHS Rehabilitation Counseling

     

    Randie Parker, chronic pain patient (diagnosed hyper-metabolizer)

    Robert D. Rose, Moderator “Veterans and Americans for Equality in Healthcare” 

    Lana Kirby, chronic pain advocate and activist 

    Greg Downey, medically retired machinist and chronic pain patient

    Shirley Wallace, chronic pain patient

    Anne Fuqua, BSN, pain patient / patient advocate

    Roberta Glick, chronic pain patient, social worker, advocate

    Heidi Schlossberg, chronic pain patient

    Christine Falk, chronic pain patient (fibromyalgia, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, failed back surgery)

    Audrey Liebl, owner of “Fibrom-L”, former EMT/firefighter, chronic pain patient and advocate since 1998

    Christine Smith, B.A. Social Welfare, M.A. Rehabilitation Counseling, CVE, retired. disabled. chronic pain patient 

    Kathy Kempken, chronic pain patient 14 years (trigeminal neuropathic craniofacial pain syndrome).  Fifteen years professional experience in safety, health and environmental affairs for The Boeing Company

     

    Kimberly Miller, Director of Advocacy, KentuckianaFibromyalgia Support Group 

     

    Stacey Milligan, chronic intractable pain patient 

    Mary A Rooney, LCSW, chronic pain patient.

    Theresa Boehm, chronic pain advocate

    Rose Bigham, disabled chronic pain patient 

    Elana Trefzer, chronic pain patient

    Kena Gottier, RN, CMT-US Group Administrator, Chronic Pain Patient

    Calvin Kramer, chronic pain patient

    Richard L Martin,BSPharm, chronic pain advocate

    David Becker, chronic pain advocate

    Cathy Kean, chronic pain patient, writer, advocate

     

     

    Why I Resigned From USPF


    Hello Luvs,

    It is with sadness that I write this blog post today. I would never intentionally hurt anyone. But I wanted my followers/friends in the pain community to know that this was the most difficult thing that I’ve ever had to do. I loved doing this volunteer work for USPF. They always told me that we were a “family”. Yet, the very day that I lost my Long acting/Extended release pain medication, I opened an email that was just the opposite of everything I thought we stood for. Since that email, I have contemplated resigning, but did not want to “hurt” anyone or do anything to leave them without enough board members etc. But from that day on, things just went down hill. Next, I saw a trailer for a movie that stars actress Karen Duffy and our Interim CEO, called “Balancing the Pain Scale”, that I found out has been in production for 2-3 years. As a Board member, I knew nothing about this movie until someone else alerted me. I went to the trailer and was saddened when I saw the words get “beyond the pill bottle” as I was losing the one thing that had given me some semblance of a life; and so are so many of you.

    Lastly, I must add that in the past, I was sent copies of kind emails that pain patients would send in about me. I was also sent emails about patients who needed my help. I never received any emails/letters such as these since becoming a Board member. Not until a disgruntled pain patient who was removed from one of my groups for being disrespectful and unkind sent the interim CEO an email. This person spelled my name incorrectly as “Susan Stuart”, she obviously does not know me and did not know me at all. I felt belittled and reprimanded by being sent the code of ethics. Especially when the issues had nothing to do with USPF and I did not use my role in any conversations with that person. I did not receive a personal phone call, nor did anyone request any information or clarification regarding the absurd complaint; after my years of loyalty to USPF. Therefore, you can read the end result in my recent letter to the Board members below:

    Dear Nicole, Wendy, Ellen, Leah & Bruce,

    When I was initially asked to join the Board of Directors of the USPF, I was pleased and excited to be joining a group that I feel is  doing wonderful things and representing the interests of the pain community.

    Very quickly, (due to Paul’s behaviors+)I discovered that this perception was not true. However, I decided to help shoulder the burden of guiding USPF through the trauma of the aftermath of of Paul’s mishandling of funds & more. Also to stay & help with USPF losing its founder and CEO. As time went on, shocking details of misuse of funds & other inappropriate behaviors kept adding up.kept adding up. I decided that it was my duty to stick by Nicole  & the other Board members & our legal team, to help clean up this mess & help to guide US Pain Foundation in the right direction.

    I have become increasingly frustrated because everything that was promised to me upon becoming a Board member has not happened. I was told that I could represent US pain foundation at Pain week in Las Vegas 2018. I was also told that I would be put on an advisory board and be given a program of my own to run and see through to the end. I have been told repeatedly that as a Board member I cannot officially run any programs, but others do. I feel that those things I’m most passionate about are marginalized. I feel that somehow I was inadvertently sought out & appointed to the Board, because somehow, some person(s) thought that I would just agree and not ever express my own voice and opinions. But I do have opinions and a voice. I’m sad that as a board member I don’t know who any of our donors are and I didn’t find out about the movie that’s been in production for three years, I was told? There’s so many things I don’t know but then Leah told me that “there’s no one higher than the board”? It’s a bit confusing in all honesty. I feel “kept in the dark” about many things.

    One big reason or probably the that I feel the need to resign from the board of directors of the US Pain foundation starting immediately, is due to the lack of  insurance for Board members & support group members. I don’t feel “safe” being involved with voting on big decisions yet being “left in the dark” much of the time. I don’t really know where money is going or where n it comes from in all  honesty. All the things that I used to love I’m not able to do anymore because “I am a board member“.

    Last of all & sadly, I received an email today with a copy of the code of ethics from Nicole. A disgruntled pain patient from Canada, sent her note full of horrible lies & accusations. I was not consulted privately via a phone call or even given the benefit of the doubt. I have never had any trouble with not one person since I joined this or any organizations. I don’t speak or claim to speak for the USPF in any of my groups that I run. I only give facts with links to back up what I say as chronic pain patient.

    For all of the above reasons and due to the fact that I don’t feel respected, I must tender my resignation from the Board of Directors  of the US Pain Foundation immediately.

    Sadly,

    Peace & Hope,

    Suzanne B. Stewart

    about.me/suzydukettes

    Recipient of USPF’s Pain Ambassador of the Year Award‘16, Mentor & Social Media Assistant RSDSA, Staff Columnist/Ntl. Pain Report, Blog-“Tears Of Truth” @tearsoftruth.com, Patient leader WEGO Health, HoH/ASL, patient advocate for Deaf/HoH

    “Out of suffering have emerged the most massive characters are seared with scars” ~Khalil Gibran~

    Thank you for taking the time to let me share with you. I feel a deep sadness and broken at this time.